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From 132 mining operation in Papua, only 79 with clean and clear

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Illustration of mining operation in Nabire Regency – IST

Jayapura, Jubi – From 132 mining businesses, only 79 mining business permits (IUP) are declared clean and clear by Directorate General of Minerals Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources (ESDM).

Director of Mineral Business Development, Directorate General of Minerals of the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources Bambang Susigit, in Jayapura, Wednesday (August 23), said the administration of 79 mining business which declared clean and clear process is complete and their activities have met the rules.

While other 53 mining business have yet meet the procedures due to delays in delivery of documents and lack of recommendations from local governments.

“This is a constraint, with the Mining Licensing Policy Act, based on Law number 23 of 2014 on Regional Government, the authority of district and city has ended and all permits are processed by the province,” he said.

However, he stressed there are several obligations that must be tackle together such as the duty of district and municipality to organize all documents needed.

“It is expected that districts and municipalities can submit complete documents so we can processed the validation,” he said.

Furthermore, he explained from the data in the Ministry of ESDM and based on the inventory data or coaching clinic that has been done, one of the main issues is the existence of unlicensed mining activities in licensed locations.

“This is an obstacle which reduces the prospect of reserves that have been recorded and become a crucial issue, because it affects the environment and society,” he said.

This, he said is an important issue that needs to be discussed to find way to improve community welfare.

Meanwhile, Secretary Assistant for Economic Affairs and People’s Welfare of Papua, Elia Loupatty said that the existence of minerals diversified into remote areas. In some regencies in Papua such as Nabire, Paniai, hundreds of illegal mining (PETI) conduct secondary gold mining activities along Siriwo river.

For that, he said, it required an integrated coordination between regencies and provincial government that involve law enforcement officers.

“This is indispensable, because the existence of PETI causes negative impacts such as loss of local government revenue, environmental damage, mining accidents, unfavorable investor climate, social vulnerability and legal harassment,” Elia said. (*)

Economy

Papua’s endemic wood tree threatened for cooking fuel

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Illustration – Pixabay.com

Jayapura, Jubi– The population of xanthostemon novoguineensis, the endemic wood tree of Papua that locally known as ‘sowang’, nowadays has been threatened because of logging activities for cooking fuel.

“The endemic wood tree that grows in Jayapura City is continuing to extinct because of people,” said the Coordinator of the Port Numbay Greend Forum (FPPNG), Freedy Wanda to Jubi recently.

Further, he said even though an awareness campaign on the importance of sowang woods protection has done, it is not useful because indigenous people of Port Numbay are still not paying attention.

Although FPPNG has replanted some young trees, Wanda expects the Plantation and Nursery Agency could prepare as many seeds as possible.

Meanwhile, the village chief of Enggros, Orgenes Meraudje said local people are now facing difficulties with the fact that sowang woods are started to run out because people previously use it for home building.

“As now sowang woods are running out, people commonly use concretes for building their houses,” said Meraudje.

In the past, according to him, villagers had a traditional management of using sowang woods wisely; people should do a particular ritual before cutting trees, and the remarkably old trees would cut for housing. He further said houses made from the sowang woods could last for five to ten years because they are resistant to seawater and not easily broken or collapse.

Sowang wood tree mostly grows around the areas of the Mount Cycloop and Pasir Enam in Jayapura City. Unfortunately, it begins to extinct because of the needs of the household for cooking.

Sowang woods are usually for charcoals, and today because of the economic factor, those charcoals are sold to some restaurants in Jayapura City. Its well-known quality of resistance in burning process becomes the main reason why many restaurant managers prefer it for cooking fuel.

A woodcutter, Agus said he cut the sowang trees for producing charcoals. “I cut and burn it; then the charcoals are ready to sell,” he said. However, getting the sowang trees is considerably hard because they begin to extinct. So he must walk through to a very remote mountainous area. “Moving it down is also not easy because we have to go through a very poor pathway,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: David Sobolim

Editor: Pipit Maizier

 

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Economy

Oil Palm Plantation Seizes Indigenous’ Rights to Land and Education

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Illustration of oil palm plantation in Papua – Jubi

Jayapura, Jubi – A Papuan legislator Maria Elizabet Kaize said the oil palm investments, especially in the southern region of Papua, have seized the indigenous peoples’ lands and corrupted the education of young Papuans.

Maria Kaize, a native woman from Anim Ha customary area, said oil palm plantations give a negative impact on the indigenous children’s education in the district of Merauke, Boven Digoel and surrounding areas because the school-age Papuans prefer to follow their parents than going to school.

“It is true that the awareness among the school-aged Papuan children, especially in southern areas, for schooling needs to be improved. Many of them prefer to follow their parents in the forest,” Maria Kaize answered some questions from Jubi on Thursday (19/04/2018).

She took Bio area of Boven Digoel District as an example. In this area, many school-aged children join their parents as palm oil workers. Her sister, who is a local teacher, told her about this information.  She further said that the similar thing also happened Genyem and Lereh, Jayapura District, when the oil palm companies just operated in those areas.

“According to a teacher from Genyem whom I met some time ago, they went to the oil palm plantation for looking the children. Maybe this method can be used in some districts in the southern Papua. However, it needs support from the government, customary and church leaders as well as the community,” she said.

When meeting with Hilal Elver, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, a local leader from Keerom, Servius Servo said the transition of community land to oil palm plantation harmed the local people because it rated very cheap.  In fact, in some cases, they changed it with sugar and salt.

“Besides for oil palm plantations, community and sago forests mostly used for road construction and government infrastructure,” Servius said. (*)

Reporter: Arjuna Pademme

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Economy

Government Put Rice on Priority Rather than Papuan Local Food

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Papuan local food – Jubi

Jayapura, Jubi – Anthropology lecturer at the University of Cendrawasih, Jack Morin said that the government’s investment and programs are some factors in eliminating Papuan staple food.

According to him, the distribution of Rastra (rice for poor), village funds and other development programs affect the activity of indigenous Papuans in rural areas. As a result, people are less concerned about the existence of their local food. Moreover, oil palm plantations, mining areas, and other business investment have affected the availability of agriculture lands; he told Jubi on Wednesday (18/4/2018).

It is worrying, he added, this condition would lead to the problem of food security. The government has an important role to ensure that local food continues to be dominant in the community because it has everything: power, money and knowledge. With human resources it has, the government should be able to maintain the existence of local food in each region.

“It is necessary to encourage both governor and regents to be aware concerning this matter,” he said. However, he also reminds the community to be aware of their land and the potential of their local food. “Do not be consumed by investment or government’s policy;  people should maintain the sustainability of local food,” he said.

The Head of Agricultural and Horticultural Agency of Papua Province, Semuel Siriwa said the Papua Provincial Government concern about local food development. It already stipulates a policy requiring all government agencies to serve local food in meetings or events. He said this governor’s instruction is part of government’s efforts to develop food security.

“This instruction should be implemented by all government agencies. Economically, it will increase income, as well as the stability of local food security. If it occurs, farmers will be more motivated because the market is ready,” said Siriwa

The Head of the Food Security and Coordination Agency for Provincial Representative Office of Papua, Roberth Eddy Purwoko said his office would further improve local food development programs, ranging from home-scale plantation such as a home garden that can provide sustainable food.  “Local food would certainly reduce demands on food supplies from other regions,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: Arjuna Pademme

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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