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Economic, Social and Cultural Issues Attract the United Nations, National Commission for Human Rights Says

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Demonstration at the Papua parliament office urged the government to resolve human rights issues in Papua – Jubi / Arjuna.

Jayapura, Jubi – Chief Papua Representative Office of the National Commission for Human Rights (Komnas HAM), Frits Ramandey, said that human rights issues in Papua are not only about violence but economic, social, cultural and political as well. Further, he said these issues are more considerate than a violence-related human rights issue.

“Just like the problems of poverty, health, and education, the economic, social and cultural issues tend to attract the attention of the United Nations more than the violence-related human rights issues, because this illustrates a series of government’s vulnerability, omission and negligence. Therefore, it needs an intervention,” he told Jubi on Saturday (14/4/2018). Moreover, he said, the violence-related human rights issue is relatively easy to turn into the issue of crimes.

Regarding the visit of the UN Envoy to Indonesia, he also wants to ensure that several reports submitted by Komnas HAM, local partner agencies and NGOs who always get opportunities to deliver a comparison report obtained the same attention from the UN.  “The UN is obliged to ensure it: making an integrated effort,” he said.

The UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, Mr Hilal Elver, has been in Indonesia from April 9th to April 18th, 2018. During the meeting with Mr Elver on April 9th, 2018, the Indonesian Minister of Agriculture, Amran Sulaiman conveyed that the Government of Indonesia determined for not being dictated by the European Union because Indonesia has a standard in the agricultural industry. Further, he called on the UN to react to the black campaign on oil palm plantations in Indonesia that rose by member states of the European Union. The UN is expected to merely not seeing this issue from the side of deforestation, but also from the community welfare.

On April 10th, 2018, Mr Elver visited Komnas HAM office to find out more information about the fulfillment of the right to food in Indonesia. Komnas HAM Vice Chairman, Ms Sandrayati Moniaga said from the aspect of health access, the Commission highlights the case of malnutrition and child mortality in Asmat District, Papua, since September 2017. Komnas HAM views that this case was emerged because of some factors, including poor health facilities, culture and poor sanitation,” said Moniaga. While in term of food access, she said the factors are including stagnant food production, small-scale farm ownership, the extent of land conversion, and population growth. (*)

 

Reporter: Arjuna Pademme

Editor: Pipit Maizier

Arts & Culture

What is the most attractive thing to see in FDS 2018?

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Illustration of traditional Papuan dance – Jubi / Engel Wally

Sentani, Jubi – Jayapura Regent Mathius Awoitauw stated traditional food produced from sago and cultural performances would be the two most attractive things to see in Lake Sentani Festival (FDS) 2018.

Furthermore, he said location, where the festival takes place, must be set attractively to avoid an impression of a night fair event or a regular traditional market.

Those who will be directly involved in performances at the FDS, such as dancers, must wear cultural costumes. They are not allowed to wear anything else on stage,” he said.

The Second Vice Chairman of Jayapura House of Representatives Kornels Yanuaring said the FDS, which is an annual government agenda, should have a positive impact on the local community.

Visitors should acquire clear information about this event; what would perform in this festival. So, we could see their interest on the event, and it could be an indicator of the income for the local community,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: Engel Wally

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Economy

The exclusion of indigenous rights in Papua autonomy era

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Forestry Region VI Nabire Office is barred. – Jubi / Titus Ruban

Nabire, Jubi – After nearly a week, the Forestry Region VI Nabire (KCDK) Agency finally operates after the Head of KCDK Region IV Office open it since it was barred by former staff members of Nabire Forestry Agency due to the inauguration of officials and new structure in this agency by the Acting Papua Governor.

They thought the appointment of non-Papuans in the office structure is against the Law No. 21, 2001 on special autonomy, which mandates a priority should award to indigenous Papuan, particularly Nabire native. It moreover considers neglecting former civil servants of Nabire Forestry Office whose office currently merge into the provincial forestry office.

KCDK Region VI Nabire Agency was as a result of the enactment of the Law No 23, 2014 on the Regional Government and the Government Regulation No. 18, 2016 on the regional apparatus.

According to these two regulations, staff and authorities of the Regional Forestry Office transferred to the provincial office. Papua Province then opened a branch office in the district as an extension of the Provincial Forestry Office. However, the new office structure does not accommodate the former staff.

A former staff member of Nabire Forestry Office Tenni Sembor said Acting Papua Governor should refer to the Law No.21, 2001 on Papua Special Autonomy before a decision to appoint the head office and establish a new structure of KCDK Region VI Nabire. He must prioritise Nabire natives as mandated in the law. He moreover explained that none of the officers in the new structure come from Nabire District, which is the Saireri customary area, and its natives are the owner of the land tenure right in Nabire Municipality.

So we think this humiliates the rights of indigenous Papuans, in particular, the customary people in Nabire, whereas the Special Autonomy Law is the basis of protection and alignment towards the rights and local wisdom of Papua indigenous people,” said Sembor on Tuesday (5/22/2018).

Another former staff member of Nabire Forestry Office Marthinus Taa thought it is very unfair because, in this special autonomy era, none of the Nabire natives gets a position in the new structure. “While the agency is to manage forests in Nabire which associated with the customary rights of indigenous peoples,” he said.

Meanwhile, Chairman of the Customary Consultative Council (BMA) of Wate tribe of Nabire District Yohanes Wanaha expressed his concern on the inauguration. He asked Acting Governor and Papua Provincial Office to reconsider the inauguration occurred on Monday 2018.

This is an insult to the rights of indigenous and tribal peoples in this land. The Special Autonomy Law is still ongoing, but for decades, the government hardly accommodates our rights as indigenous peoples,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: Titus Ruban

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Economy

Ambaidiru, The coffee pioneer in Papua

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Yonas Nusi showing Ambaidiru coffee – Jubi / Hengky Yeimo

Tabloid, Jubi – Saturday, 6 April 2018, legislator Yonas Nusi, who represents Saireri elected area, tells Jubi about the coffee plantations in Ambaidiru, Yapen Islands District.

He said Ambaidiru coffee plantations have existed since the Dutch era in 1959. “Missionaries –known as Zending—from the Netherlands first introduced coffee to the local people. In 1977, the Aimbaidiru community and village cooperatives continued to grow and maintain the plantations, and it lasted until the 2000s,” he said.

Aimbadiru coffee was first introduced to the local community by Zending Bink in 1924. It started widely planted in 1938. So it can be said that Ambaidiru coffee plantation is a pioneer in the development of coffee plantation in Papua.

Ambaidiru is a village located in Kosiwo Sub-district of the Ambai Islands in the south of Yapen Island. With 301.367 m2, it is approximately 4914 inhabitants live in this village. During the Dutch era, Ambaidiru was a centre for the production of robusta coffee, vanilla and vegetables.

“Coffee has a long story in Papua. People should have adequate knowledge to produce a product that can fulfil the market demand,” he said.

Moreover, he said that coffee should get attention as a high value and potential commodity for the Yapen Islands. Therefore the local government must support the local people by providing skills and management training on coffee production. So the Mayor of the Yapen Islands should able to listen to people’s aspiration, because of the source of community income affect the efforts of a community. “I support the provincial government’s efforts, particularly in Yapen Islands, to promote the potential of indigenous people in every sector, principally the economic sector.

However, another important is he asked are there among the Ambaidiru young people studying agricultural and plantation? He hopes they can finish their study and return to their village to manage the coffee plantation professionally.

A youth from Yapen Islands Markus Yoseph Imbiri said there are several problems concerning the cultivation of coffee in Ambaidiru Village, namely the low maintenance. “Ambaidiru coffee suffers the problem of increasing the number of coffee production because the trees have planted since the Dutch era,” said Imbiri.

Imbiri, who is also the Chairman of IT Volunteers, said several steps have done to grow the coffee. “People ask the government to provide more seeds to scale up the plantation,” he said.

Imbiri admitted that the government already established some agencies to support the local people. Some NGOs and cooperative named Coffee Agency are also there to help. “Some institutions are still active, but some are not. But the government support to revitalise the coffee plantations is very important,” he added. (*)

 

Reporter: Hengki Yeimo

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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