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Extinct, five local languages in Papua

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Head of Papuan Language Office Toha Machsum open a seminar “Caring for Diversity through Literature” April 21 – Jubi /Roy Ratumakin

Jayapura, Jubi – Five local languages ​​in Papua Land are extinct according to Language Mapping Coordinator of Language Center at Papua and West Papua Province Yohanis Sanjoko. The five languages ​​are Tandia (Bay of Wondama), Mapia (Supiori District), Safoni (Waropen), Bonerif (Mamberamo Raya), and Wario (Waropen).

“Of the four, the Tandia language is no longer spoken and it is estimated that local people also do not use language. For the local language of Mapia only spoken by one person, but the data was taken around 1990s,” he told Jubi at his office on Wednesday (3/5/2017).

From the data of 2016, the local languages ​​of Safoni and Bonerif are only spoken by four people. The language of the Wario region has only spoken by five persons.

The extinction of the regional language, according to Sanjoko is due to the factor of society attitude of the spoken language.

“The owners of languages ​​or ancestors do not pass on their local language to their people or their children, so it is eroded by the entry of other languages,” he said.

It is said, with the extinction of the five regional languages ​​he expected to government through the Department of Education and Culture should be more active in disseminating awareness to the public on the importance of maintaining the local language so as not to extinct.

“The education starts from adults to their children, the parents should be more active in providing language-related lessons and at least using the local language at home for communication, so the children can understand that in addition to Indonesian language they also have their own mother languages, “he said.

There are 372 local languages in Papua and West Papua Provice according to 2016 data.

Prior to that, the Expert Staff of the Minister of Education and Culture of the Center for Regional Relations, Dr. James Modouw to Jubi said, local language education is important for school-age children so that the languages ​​are not marginalized by other outside cultures.

Six are threatened with extinction

Meanwhile, of the six regional languages ​​spoken in Jayapura City, one of them is threatened with extinction because it only spoken by very few people.

According to Sanjoko one of the regional languages ​​that are threatened with extinction is the language of Kayu Pulo. While other five languages: Tobati, Nafri, Skouw, Nyau, and Elseng are considerably saved.

He said in order to measure how the local languages potentially strong or threatened with extinction are based on certain evaluation. They include transmission factor, number of conformers, the obedient proportion, the transition, the language response, the availability of teaching materials, attitude of the government, attitude of the language owner, the amount, and document quality.

Sanjoko added that there are six aspects or categories to find out how far the spread of local languages ​​in a region or village.

“Mostly in Papua, one Kampung (village) potentially has different languages to another village ​​or has different dialects. To measure it, we classified them according to category of safe, easy, and stable, besides other category of endangered, critical, and extinct,” he said.

For the Kayo Pulo language fell into the category of endangered because its speakers are only a few people left.

Language examiner of Papuan and West Papua Language Center Ely Maramuri urges parents to have a more important role to instill local languages ​​to their children. (*)

Reporter: Roy Ratumakin

Editor: Zely Ariane

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Papua Printing Company to support young Papuan writers

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Komunitas Sastra Papua (Papuan Literature Community) when launching a discussion on literacy education in Jayapura. – Jubi/Hengky Yeimo

Jayapura, Jubi- Komunitas Sastra Papua (Papuan Literature Community) asked the Papua Provincial Government to reactive the regional company ‘Percetakan Rakyat Papua’ (Papua Regional Printing Company) to response the current demand of publication since many young Papuans are now becoming a writer.

However, the main constraint is in printing,” said the secretary of Komunitas Sastra Papua (Kosapa) Aleks Giyai on Thursday (31/5/2018).

Percetakan Rakyat Papua is considered bringing opportunities for Papuans to get the lower-cost printing. “To print some printed items such as books, magazines, calendars and so on, we have to make an order in Java. Even though the printing cost is quite cheaper, the shipping cost is expensive,” explained Giyai.

Meanwhile, cultural activist Andy Tagihuma thought books play a crucial role in developing a character of a nation. “The gradual progress of literacy development in Papua is a result of the inconsistent book publishing,” said Tagihuma.

He further said Papua should be able to produce and publish books and other writings locally like what has been done by the University of Cenderawasih in the past, which printed most of their writings such as Warta Uncen and other scientific journals independently. “But now they mostly send it to Java for printing,” he said. (*)

Reporter: Hengky Yeimo

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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What is the most attractive thing to see in FDS 2018?

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Illustration of traditional Papuan dance – Jubi / Engel Wally

Sentani, Jubi – Jayapura Regent Mathius Awoitauw stated traditional food produced from sago and cultural performances would be the two most attractive things to see in Lake Sentani Festival (FDS) 2018.

Furthermore, he said location, where the festival takes place, must be set attractively to avoid an impression of a night fair event or a regular traditional market.

Those who will be directly involved in performances at the FDS, such as dancers, must wear cultural costumes. They are not allowed to wear anything else on stage,” he said.

The Second Vice Chairman of Jayapura House of Representatives Kornels Yanuaring said the FDS, which is an annual government agenda, should have a positive impact on the local community.

Visitors should acquire clear information about this event; what would perform in this festival. So, we could see their interest on the event, and it could be an indicator of the income for the local community,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: Engel Wally

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Papuan Voices promotes indigenous Papuans in film festival

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Papuan Film Festival II Committee when holding a press conference at Jerat Papua office, Jayapura City. – Jubi / Abeth You

Jayapura, Jubi – Papuan Voices will promote indigenous Papuans through Papua Film Festival II (FFP II) which is running in Jayapura City on 7 – 9 August 2018.

Papuan Voices established in 2011 and now stations in six regions of Papua, namely Biak, Jayapura, Keerom, Wamena, Merauke, Sorong and Raja Ampat.

“The theme of FFP II is indigenous Papuans struggling facing modernization. We chose this theme to response the current situation occurred in Papua,  said Chairman of the Committee of FFP II Harun Rumbarar in Jayapura on Thursday (7/5/2018).

In this festival, Papuan Voices wants to increase public awareness on the critical issues faced by indigenous Papuans.

“Also, it acts as a forum to strengthen filmmakers networking in Papua. Our works further explain the position of indigenous peoples in facing the waves of development and investment,” he said.

Meanwhile, FFP II Secretary Bernard Koten said his organisation recently focus on producing a short documentary film about human and the land of Papua, which assign to all levels of community in Papua, Indonesia and abroad.

“To see Papua through the eyes of Papuans, in the form of a documentary film,” Koten said. (*)

 

Reporter: Abeth You

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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