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“I am a Father and Mother” and “Nagosa” in Papua Film Fest

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Nelson Lokobal and Christian Kogoya while showing his film work at Rumah Bina Wamena-Jubi/Islami

Wamena, Jubi – “I’m a Father and Mother” and “Nagosa” (Mama), two documentary films by Nelson Lokobal and Christian Kogoya, tells  much about native social life of the Baliem Valley.

Prior to its premiere at the Papua Film Festival (FFP) on August 7-9 in Merauke, Nelson (19) and Christina, a high school XII student, revealed a bit of the story behind their work.

“I am a Father and Mother” by Nelson, tells of the struggle of Desiana Sorabut, a 6th grader, along with her two siblings, shall live without their parents.

“So, the story is about Desiana parents who died when her still in grade 2 of elementary school,” said Nelson in Wamena.

In the film, Nelson describes the power of a girl as small as Desiana who was forced to take on the role of a parent in a family. After sitting in 6th grade, she does all the work like other parents in her village to keep her ‘kitchen aflame’ on.

“Wake up in the morning, she must go to the garden to get the vegetables and sell it to the city … During the day after school,s he must return to the garden to plant vegetables and hipere (sweet potato). Keep the garden so that there are always crops … at least there are vegetables with hipere in the kitchen. That’s what she did for herself and siblings,” he said.

Not just taking care of his garden. One of her parents’ treasures is a pig. Pig farm in the yard of the house. Occasionally, he sells boiled peanuts his garden produce, at school.

“The fate of children like Desiana is similar to many people in the city of Wamena … the story was for me interested so I made the film,” Nelson explained.

Another worthy documentary film is “Nagosa.” The high school student XII’s film tells the story of the role of a woman and motherwho works hard to sustain the needs of her family, even to support her husband’s education.

Every day, Nagosa must travel 4 km from her home in the suburb of Wamena to the center of the city.

Christina said, “Every day, I swees the road around the town of Wamena. From the job, she earned a wage from the local government. In addition, he also sells firewood,” she said.

Those two stories are included in a series of Papuan documentaries on the FFP next week.

Arts & Culture

Native languages of Jayapura Municipality threatened with extinction

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Illustration of Enggros Village in Jayapura – steemit.com

Jayapura, Jubi – Some local or native languages in Jayapura Municipality threaten to be extinct if not immediately protected.

“There are many native Papuan languages in Tanah Tabi (Jayapura Municipality), namely Sentani, Nafri, Tobati Enggros, Kayu Pulo and Skouw languages. In general, except for Sentani language, the sustainability of these languages is quite apprehensive,” said Suharyanto, a senior researcher from the Indonesian Language Center of Papua and West Papua on Friday (05/10/2018) in Jayapura City.

Moreover, he said the Indonesian Language Center for Papua and West Papua Area had research on Nafri and Tobati Enggross languages in Jayapura Municipality in 2003 and 2004.

“In the case of Nafri language, if there is no serious action taken by speakers and the state, it is estimated that in the next three generations this language would become extinct. It is similar for Tobati Enggros and Kayu Pulo languages,” he said.

Meanwhile, regarding Kayu Pulo language, although it has not been studied yet, but based on the proximity of the place and the number of speakers, it can be concluded also be threatened with extinction.

The endangered of these three regional languages, he continued, is related to the decline in the number of speakers, its locations, the use of language and people’s assimilation.

Furthermore, Suharyanto said a solution to protect the native languages in Tanah Tabi is to include it in some learning materials in schools. “The municipal government has initiated an effort to protect the local languages by preparing the local content teaching materials or books to be taught at the elementary schools,” he said.  (*)

Source: Antara

Editor: Pipit Maizier

 

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Sago Festival, an effort to revitalize local Papuan food

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Sagoo cultivation – Jubi.doc

The imported and convenient food has considered ‘colonizing’ the local food in Papua gradually due to some reasons including transportation and migration.

Easy access of transportation and migration has accelerated the disappearance of the local food such as papeda (Papuan traditional food made from sago), sweet potatoes, taro, red fruit (pandanus) and so on.

Papua Jungle Chef Coordinator Charles Toto told reporters in Jayapura, Tuesday, October 2, 2018, that in the Oceania Parliament session, he proposed a forum to restore the glory of local Papuan food.

“We consider throwing back the local food through the traditional food festival such as ‘eating papeda served in ‘sempe’ as well as other local food festivals,” said Toto.

Furthermore, he said there is a significant change in the local food consumption among the indigenous Papuans. Therefore, the government must take serious attention to this situation.

For example, record some traditional recipes from the elderly. In that way, their grandchildren can learn, know and practice it in their daily lives. Also, the raw ingredients in nature must not remove.

“We explore the traditional recipes that currently become extinct from our parents and try to preserve it,” he said. Moreover, he said,” It is to show the richness of local Papuan food to the international community.”

Toto, who had just attended the Slow Food Festival in Milan, Italy, continued that people abroad were surprised and admired the recipes for the local Papuan food. However, ironically, he said, whether, in Papua or Indonesia, it becomes less popular.

“Papua jungle chef presents our recipes in that event, and also show the identity of Papuan indigenous people,” he said.

“We showed them that we maintain this traditional food, we fight for it and live with it. We want to show to the world that the indigenous Papuans is capable for doing this,” added Toto.

Meanwhile, the Sago Activist Community of Papua is also actively conducting sago festivals in many villages involving the local community.  Sago festival consider valuable as an effort to save the sago forests and local spices.

A few days ago a sago festival conducted in Kampung Abar, Ebungfauw sub-district, Jayapura District. The festival will regularly hold every 30 September since 2017. In this festival, sago serves in ‘sempe’, a local name for special pottery for serving ‘papeda’.  If in the previous year, it only served 50 sempe, but this time it had at least 150 sempe.

“We are very committed because most sago areas in Indonesia are in Jayapura, Papua, as well as its varieties. Also, Papuans have religious and cultural relations with sago,” said Marshall Suebu, the Coordinator of Sago Activist Community of Papua.

According to Suebu, sago is essential in the culture of the indigenous Papuans, especially those who live in the coastal areas. These local communities have even known this plant and processed it for their daily food many years ago.

Thus, the community that is led by Suebu hopes that Papua Provincial Government will support their activities. He already met some ondoafi (local name for a tribal chief) in Jayapura District to discuss sago and its future conservation.

“(Ondoafi) they welcome us very well,” Suebu said. Moreover, he said they support the proposal by providing lands for sago cultivation.

“In Toware village, they provide 15 hectares for us, while in Evale village, there are 25 hectares. Meanwhile, Abar village has already provided 20 hectares of sago land,” said Suebu.

Currently, Papua Provincial Government has attempted to cultivate sago through the ‘sago movement’ in which every woman has been encouraged to plant at least ten sago trees. Sago is also regarded as a potential commodity and an alternative food for rice. (*)

Reporter: Hengky Yeimo

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Rp 900 million for Mummy conservation in Baliem Valley

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Baliem Valley Mummy – Jub/Islami

Wamena, Jubi -Office of Tourism and Culture, Jayawijaya District had
budgeted Rp 900 million for mummy conservation that will be conducted
at several points in local area. The funds are used to purchase tools
and chemicals that all must be imported from outside Papua.

“The source of Rp 900 million funds are from Special Autonomy scheme
that we use, the tools and wire and other chemicals needed must be
imported from Surabaya,” said Head of Tourism and Culture of
Jayawijaya Regency, Alpius Wetipo, Wednesday (November 1)

According to him, experts who conserve mummies in Jayawijaya have
entered the final stage, they are referring from the existing data and
discussions with residents in the location of Mummy.

“Mummy damage is caused by rat bites and livestock and lack of care by
local residents,” Wetipo said.

Conservation activities including maintenance and protection have been
carried out at four places including Aikima, Araboda, Yiwika and Pumo.

Regent of Jayawijaya, Wempi Wetipo acknowledged that mummy is part of
the tourism sector importance in Jayawijaya which became the domestic
and foreign tourist attraction.(tabloidjubi.com/Zely)

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