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Full Freedom of West Papua: The message from the streets, for the streets

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Illustration of Full Freedom music video – IST

Melbourne, Jubi – The music video track, Full Freedom, draws parallels between the rise of racial violence in the USA, and violence against West Papuans in Papua.

ARIA nominated producer Airileke & Dizz1 have joined forces again to release a new remix of the song “Full Freedom” through Rize of the Morning Star. Having put out the original track and a video for the song in 2012, the updated release is a Krump mix that includes a sample from Tight Eyez, the creator of Krump himself saying:

“it needs to be addressed; it needs to be acknowledged that this is happening.” Tight Eyez, Creator of Krump

The audio is taken from an interview where he elaborates on Krump as a movement and art form, and his assertion on the importance of raising awareness about the ongoing human rights abuses in West Papua.

The song also contains excerpts from a speech given at the United Nations 20 years ago by Benny Wenda, the exiled Independence leader and spokesperson for The United Liberation Movement for West Papua. Although heavy with campaign messaging from the Free West Papua movement, the new “Skittles & Tea” mix and film clip is named in reference to Trayvon Martin, an unarmed, African American 17 year old who was shot and killed on his way home from the store.

Although unjustified, his shooting was ruled “legal” by a Florida jury.  This remix and video are Rize of the Morning Star’s response to a situation in both the USA and West Papua where police brutality happens with impunity.  In these times we see some Freedom but we still seek Full Freedom.

“Hip hop has always had that vibe of pushing back against oppression. What I love about Krump is the fact that it is resistance through dance and music – it’s not about a Rapper. It’s more collective than that, its more tribal than that, the raw aggression in Krump is something that Pacific Islanders can relate to”, says Airileke

About the music video

Produced in a collaboration of Rize of the Morning Star teams in Australia and the USA, the video was created to dramatize the ongoing human rights struggle in West Papua, and to start a conversation about solidarity across borders for all people experiencing marginalization in their communities.

The video features world renowned dancers from both continents; in Australia the internationally acclaimed  Torres Strait Islander dancer Albert David represents indigenous Australia’s solidarity with West Papua as he raises the symbol of West Papuan freedom, the Morning Star flag.

Raising the Morning Star Flag in solidarity on U.S. soil are world renowned krumpers Baby Tight Eyex, Preston Projecc, KidBeast 88, and JBeast Carson.

“This is the first time a solidarity video from the U.S. has been made, so we really wanted to create a piece that showed iconic American imagery and artists, then present it alongside their Melanesian counterparts. We wanted to speak to the fact that although we are far apart in distance, our worlds are connected through our common struggles,” said Jewell Faamaligi, Representative for the RIZE team in the U.S..

The point of naming it after Trayvon is to speak to the reality that at the end of the day we all want the same thing; to be able to return home safely from doing something as innocuous as going to the store to buy Skittles and tea. When an injustice happens anywhere in the world we all feel it deeply, because it is an unwanted reminder of how fragile the lives of people of color are.”

Through this film clip we wanted to show to the Papuan people that their cries have been heard on the other side of the Pacific Ocean. This is a message from the streets, for the streets. This track bridges from one end of the Pacific to the other.… its a bridge created for the message of West Papua from the Streets of Moresby to the Streets of L.A.

The title of the track also references what is going on in the United States right now. “At the moment we see the same things going on in Australia, with political leaders giving space for the rise of overt racism,” said Arilike.

“West Papua has the largest Gold and Copper mine in the world, most likely the device you are reading this on comes from resources extracted from West Papua. The Freeport mine was part of the deal the USA and Australia made with Indonesia to allow West Papua to be handed over to Indonesia.

We have since seen the indigenous population decline from over 95% to less than 47% in just 50 years,” he also said.(*)

 

Source: Rize of the Morning Star

Editor: Zely Ariane

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Arts & Culture

Taparu in Kamoro socioculture

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Kamoro women when sorting out sago caterpillars. – Jubi / Doc

Mimika, Jubi – Each clan in Kamoro has ‘taparu’ or a specific location as a place to find food sources when they encircle rivers and mangroves in the lowland estuary of Mimika District.

A Dutch anthropologist J Power states ‘taparu’ is a local terminology emphasizing the relations of land and its inhabitants. “There are also the names of surrounding neighborhoods taken from the ancestral names,” as written in a book “Taparu Fratri of Mimika-Kamoro ethnic groups in Hiripau Village, East Mimika District, Mimika Regency”, by Dessy Pola Usmany et al. from the Ministry Education and Culture Directorate General of Culture Papua Cultural Value Conservation Center, 2013.

‘Taparu’ itself is more related to groups who inhabit within this region or surrounding environment as Kamoro people always encircle the river and sago forest for catching fish or gathering food. Everyone knows their own ‘taparu’.

‘Taparu’ in Kamoro language means the land, while Sempan people call it ‘se iwake’. If someone wants to mark the land he passes in gathering food, he solely adds the prefix ‘we’ such as tumamero-we and efato-we in Omawka village.

Similarly, people in Nawaripi village also do the same. Their areas are including Tumukamiro-we, Viriao-we, and Iwiri-we. All of these names reflect the relationship between the land and inhabitants.

Meanwhile, like the majority of Kamoro people, Ojibwa people believe in the power of their late patrilineal clan that depicted in the symbols of animals. The anthropologists call these symbols with totems which mean a belief that embodies a symbolic representation of society.

Unfortunately, today taparu also face the severest challenges of sedimentation due to tailings of mining activity that cause the silting of river and discolouration of Mollusca habitat in the estuary of Mimika District. (*)

 

Reporter: Dominggus Mampioper

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Jayapura indigenous school pays attention to children’s rights

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Children in the Indigenous School learn how to carve. – Jubi / Engel Wally

Sentani, Jubi – Director of Indigenous School of Jayapura District Origen Monim stated that he would pay attention to the rights of children studying at his school as it stands in an area declared as a child-friendly village.

“We have a guide about what indicator of a child-friendly village is, which was given by the Head of the Women Empowerment and Child Protection Office. So it would be our concern,” said Monim in Sentani on Tuesday (09/11/2018).

He further explained that the indigenous school runs their activities every day, from 14:00 to 16:30 Papua time, and a speedboat provided to pick up students to school.

“So far we operate independently. In the future, we would also try to provide snacks or additional food for children in Khandei class, namely for those aged 8-13 years,” he explained.

Meanwhile, the Head of Women Empowerment and Child Protection Office of Jayapura District, Maria Bano confirmed on the guide of the child-friendly village that already implemented in the Indigenous School of Jayapura District.

“Children from formal school continue their learning activities there, in the indigenous school, which encourage children playing and having fun with their friends. Because at their age, children need to observe their environment and people around them,” said Bano. (*)

 

Reporter: Engel Wally

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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KNPB supports Kanaky for self-determination

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KNPB and Gempar Papua activists at the Secretariat of Central KNPB. – Jubi / Hengky Yeimo

Jayapura, Jubi – Central West Papua National Committee (KNPB) held a limited discussion to support FKLNS (Organization of the Liberation Struggle of the Kanaky Tribe in New Caledonia) which has been well received by the Melanesian Spearhead Group (MSG) to conduct a referendum in November 2018.

The First Chairman of Central KNPB Agus Kosay said it’s time for Kanaky to get self-determination from French colonialism.

“Kanaky must declare their self-determination. If Kanaky gets their independence, it would be able to give their support to West Papua because we share the same situation, which lives under the colonialism,” he said on Wednesday (08/12/2018) in Jayapura.

Meanwhile a member of Gempar (Papuan Youth and Student Movement) Nelius Wenda said as a nation oppressed by Indonesia, West Papua fully supports the referendum agenda of New Caledonia.

“Kanaky must determine their destiny. It must be far better than being under the French colonialism. In the future we Papuans are just like Kanaky,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: Hengky Yeimo

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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