Connect with us

Internasional News

International Academics for West Papua to launch its European branch in Britain

Published

on

Illustration International consultation on West Papua 22-24
February 2017 in Geneva, hosted by the World Council of Churches –
Victor Mambor

Nabire, Jubi – International Academics for West Papua (IAWP) is a
network that was started in 2016 by a group of academics concerned
about the ongoing human rights abuses in West Papua, will launch its
European region branch this month.

IAWP welcome academics from all countries and all disciplines. The aim
of the network is t to express extreme concern about the prevalence of
human rights abuses carried out by Indonesian security forces in West
Papua.

It was officially launched in the Australia-Pacific region on
September 1 at the University of Sydney’s conference, ‘Beyond the
Pacific: West Papua on the World Stage’, hosted by the West Papua
Project.

The ribbon was cut by West Papuan leader, Jacob Rumbiak, to an
audience of Papuans and their international supporters. It also
included and welcome the network’s new patrons, Dr Benny Giay and
Professor Noam Chomsky.

The European branch of the International Academics for West Papua is
set to launch on Wednesday November 15 at the British Houses of
Parliament in 4:30PM Grimond Room, Portcullis House.

The branch will be launched during an introductory meeting of the
All-Party Parliamentary Group on West Papua, a cross-party group of
MPs and Lords which seeks to promote West Papuan self-determination
and human rights at a high political level.

The launch will feature talks from several academics and researchers
on issues from British foreign policy in West Papua to the thorny
issue of a proposed independence referendum.
It will be joined by parliamentarians, activists, journalists and
legal professionals.

Below is IAWP official open letter launched in September 2016, as well
as it platform of foundation:

Open letter to the Government of Indonesia

We academics from around the world express extreme concern about the
prevalence of human rights abuses carried out by Indonesian security
forces in West Papua.

Since 1969, the Indonesian army has routinely fired into non-violent
demonstrations, burned down villages and tortured civilian activists
and bystanders.

Despite being routinely barred from the provinces, independent
observers like Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International and Tapol
have all documented severe and endemic human rights violations by
Indonesia across West Papua. Indonesian special forces and
counter-terrorism units like Kopassus and Detachment 88 – trained by
Western countries – are implicated in beatings, extra judicial
assassinations and mass killings.

Such a heavy military presence, combined with racism and structural
economic discrimination against the indigenous Papuan population, can
only result in conflict and abuse.

We therefore call upon the government of Indonesia and our own
governments to take urgent and effective action to ensure that:

• The Indonesian military swiftly withdraws from West Papua and that
Indonesia demilitarise the region as a first step towards a peaceful
resolution to the conflict;
• Indonesia releases political prisoners and allows international
media, NGOs and observers into West Papua;
• The international community takes a firm stance on human rights
abuses in West Papua and calls for Indonesia to respect the Universal
Declaration on Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil
and Political Rights, to which Indonesia is a party.
• Military and police training and arms exports for Indonesia are
terminated until human rights abuses in West Papua cease, including
Australian, American, British, Canadian, Dutch, New Zealand, training
and funding of the Indonesian police’s counter-terrorism unit,
Detachment 88, at the Jakarta Centre for Law Enforcement Cooperation.
• Indonesia and the International Community recognize the historic
injustice of the 1969 ‘Act of Free Choice’, by which the population of
West Papua was denied its right to self determination and coerced into
joining Indonesia, and that they take steps to address the historic
injustice in a manner supported by the majority of Papuans.

Signed by:

Noam Chomsky, Professor Emeritis, MIT
Michael Webb, Lecturer, University of Sydney
Camellia Webb-Gannon, Research Fellow, Western Sydney University
Helen Gardner, Associate Professor, Deakin University
Grant McCall, Affiliate, University of Sydney
Nicholas Lawrence, Associate Professor, University of Warwick
Marcus Campbell, University of Sydney
Stephen Hill, Emeritus Professor, University of Wollongong
Julian McKinlay King, Researcher, West Papua Project, University of Sydney
Thomas Petersson, Senior Lecturer, Mälardalen University
Robert Amery, Senior Lecturer, University of Adelaide
Grant Walton, ANU
Selogadi Mampane, Part-time Lecturer, Vega University
Cornelis Mara, University of Papua
Megan Williams, Senior Lecturer, UTS
Michael Atkins, Lecturer, City of Bristol College
Vivienne Yeki, Teacher, Christchurch Teachers College
Adeline Cooke, Visiting Lecturer, University of Central Lancashire

Source: academicsforpapua.org
Editor: Zely Ariane

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Internasional News

ULMWP appeals to PIF for support on West Papua issue at UN

Published

on

By

United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMWP) leaders (L to R), Octovianus Mote, Benny Wenda and Rex Rex Rumakiek – Jubi

“There are two topics in the West Papuan struggle; one — Pacific leaders facing natural disasters and two – we in West Papua are facing genocide in our country.

“In addition West Papua is also saving the planet because as the second largest rain forest after the Amazon, we simply say politically, West Papua is the lung of the world and by saving it; we are also saving the world. Who knows what is going to happen in one hundred years’ time because the islands are sinking. West Papua can become the home of the Pacific (people) during sea level rise. I always tell Pacific leaders that when you save West Papua, you save the Pacific. When Vanuatu presents the West Papua Case to PIF, it is our prayer that other Pacific leaders will also support Vanuatu to take West Papua to the UN Decolonisation Committee”.

That is the message of the Chairman of the United Liberation Movement of West Papua (ULMWP), Benny Wenda, to the Pacific Islands Forum’s 49th Session at Nauru this week.

Member of Parliament for Ambrym Albert William says what Father Walter Lini said about West Papua is true that Vanuatu must continue to support freedom for West Papua.

“Now the issue of climate change has reached critical stage in West Papua and especially seeing what is happening in nearby Australia now. The signs are there. It is visible, you can feel it, you can see it. The Great Barrier Reef is facing a lot of stress from the negative excessive impact of development. It is a threat to all the reefs of the islands. When there is no reef, there is no fish and there is no food for humanity. The Australian Government has no other way but to step in to help farmers who are facing drought now”.

That is the view of MP William, a former Director of the Department of Environment of the Vanuatu Government.

He entered the Grand Hotel to join members of the ULMWP Executive as it finalised its stand ahead of the Pacific Islands Forum 49th Meeting in Nauru, where climate change is one of the prominent issues on the agenda.

Speaking for Geobjects, an organization that has developed a software to help Governments to better manage their environments while the Governments are allowing private companies and international conglomerates to exploit natural resources like what the American company is doing mining mineral resources in the second largest open cast mine in the world at Free Port Mine in West Papua, Geobjects Global Operations Manager Paul Montague of Australia says the advantage of the software is that it shows all the impacts of such giant or minimum developments and also predicts what is going to happen in the future.

Montagne says the software was developed to help Governments in Africa, Asia and the Pacific to better equip themselves in the way they allow their natural resources to be exploited.

Asked how a member country of the Pacific Islands Forum (PIF) can have access to the software, Montagne explains, “We would go into the countries that are interested in our product and sit down with them and try and establish a base line.

Asked if a PIF country has shown interest in the software, Montagne says countries further afield including Nigeria and Chana in Africa and the African Union have shown interests in the software.

While on the subject of Africa, he says the challenges facing Africa are similar to West Papua where foreign companies set up to reap the benefits from the countries’ natural resources while on the long run, leaving behind environmental damages difficult to correct.

Chairman of Liberation Movement of West Papua Benny Wenda says his country has become a regional issue and cannot go away from the PIF. “So far Vanuatu has been the only country to talk about the plight of West Papua but now we need more leaders from the Pacific to take up the West Papua issue. For example the PNG Prime Minister Peter O’Neil has already stated that West Papua has to be taken back to the UN and so the Pacific has to be duty bound to take the case to the UN”, Wenda says.

“We are not asking the Pacific to invade Indonesia, we are asking them to sit down and discuss the issue as to whether the UN or Indonesia is right or wrong. We have to revisit the West Papua Issue. As members of the UN, Pacific leaders have a moral obligation to bring this case to the UN.

The human rights issues in West Papua are getting worse and worse. Last month in August, 49 West Papuan students were arrested across West Papua; killings and rapes by Indonesian soldiers are happening. Even last month in Dunga, there were displacement of Melanesians and human atrocities but nobody was there to report on the issues while Indonesia is assuring Melanesians, Polynesian and Micronesians that they are the good guys promoting democracy in the islands. But you cannot bring development on top of suffering. (*)

By Len Garae for Vanuatu Daily.

Continue Reading

Headlines

PIANGO wants Pacific leaders to commit over West Papua

Published

on

By

Since the latter part of 2017, fighters with the West Papuan Liberation Army, or TPN, have intensified hostilities with Indonesia’s military and police in Tembagapura and its surrounding region in Papua’s Highlands. Photo: RNZ / Suara Wiyaima

Pasific, Jubi – Pacific Island civil society says the Pacific Island Forum leaders must support Vanuatu’s effort to take the issue of West Papua to the UN.

The executive director of the civil society umbrella group, PIANGO, or the Pacific Islands Association of Non Government Organisations, Emele Duituturaga, said they continue to be concerned with ongoing human rights violations in Indonesia’s Papuan provinces.

Ms Duituturaga said the issue of West Papua has been on the leaders agenda for decades without evident progress.

She said PIANGO had raised its concerns over the last two years, but nothing had changed.

Her organisation has called for a UN Special Rapporteur on West Papua to investigate continued human rights violations; support for a UN General Assembly Resolution to include West Papua on the UN Decolonisation List; and scrutiny of development co-operation with Indonesia and participation in the Pacific Island Forum.

Selected people representing civil society will meet with Pacific leaders next week at the leaders’ summit in Nauru. (*)

 

Source: radionz.co

Continue Reading

Headlines

What Drives Indonesia’s Pacific Island Strategy?

Published

on

By

Jakarta is courting Pacific Island states, hoping to change regional positions on the West Papua issue. -Image Credit: Flickr / Ahmad Syauki

 By Grant Wyeth

Indonesia has recently been lifting its presence in the Pacific, courting a number of Pacific Island countries in an attempt to quell the region’s sympathies for the independence movement in the Indonesian province of West Papua.

A particular recent focus has been on boosting relations with a number of Micronesian states as a way of gaining influence in the Pacific Islands Forum (PIF). In July, the President of the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) visited Jakarta, holding talks with President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo. Indonesia also has instigated plans to open a consulate in the FSM. Previously, Indonesian consular services in the region were run out of its Tokyo embassy. In February, an Indonesian cabinet minister was dispatched to Nauru for the tiny island’s 50th anniversary of independence, bringing with him a Papuan band. Both Nauru and Tuvalu have recently expressed support for Jakarta’s regional development programs in West Papua.

Beyond Micronesia, in April a delegation from the Melanesian state of Solomon Islands was invited to tour Indonesia’s West Papua and Papua provinces, which seems to have led to a review of Solomon Islands policy toward West Papua. Shifts in position toward the Indonesian province from Nauru, Tuvalu, and potentially Solomon Islands would be considered a significant victory for Jakarta, which previously accused these countries of “misusing” their platforms at the United Nations General Assembly to be critical of Indonesia’s policies in West Papua.

This increased Indonesian outreach comes during the ongoing deliberation over the application of the United Liberation Movement for West Papua to become a full member of the Melanesian Spearhead Group (MSG), an issue that seems to have divided the organization. In late-July the Director-General of the MSG stated that discussions on the situation in West Papua don’t belong in the forum. However, last week Vanuatu appointed a special envoy to the restive province.

Vanuautu remains the most staunch supporter of the West Papuan independence movement, and it is a sentiment held strongly by both political elites and civil society within the country. Former Vanuatu Prime Minister Sato Kilman, who was a driving force behind Indonesia gaining observer status to the MSG, was forced to resign from office in 2013 partly due to a public suspicion that he was too close to Indonesia. The then-incoming prime minister swiftly cancelled a defense agreement with Indonesia, which had Jakarta providing equipment and assistance to the Vanuatu police.

In 2013, with Fiji suspended from the Pacific Island Forum (PIF), Fiji’s then-military dictator, Frank Bainimarama sought to set up the Pacific Islands Development Forum (PIDF) as a competitor to the PIF. At the following year’s forum then-Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (SBY) paid a three day visit to Fiji and delivered a keynote address to the PIDF, pledging $20 million over five years to climate change and natural disaster-proofing initiatives. Since then, Fiji’s opposition Social Democratic Liberal Party (SODELPA) has claimed Indonesia has given military support to Fiji in exchange for support for West Papua, and for Indonesia’s observer status in the MSG. The relationship between Fiji and Indonesia seems to be seen by Bainimarama has a potential bridge for Fiji into Asia, by-passing Australia, and for Indonesia, as a way to gain the support of one of the region’s more powerful actors.

The issue continues to create complexity within the Pacific’s Melanesian states. Recently Papua New Guinea Prime Minister, Peter O’Neill, has advocated the issue of West Papuan independence be taken to the United Nations decolonization committee. However, the land border that PNG shares with Indonesia has constrained its ability to forcefully advocate for the West Papuan cause. And PNG’s own secessionist movement in Bougainville also requires Port Moresby to tread carefully for fear of reciprocal interference in its own affairs. (*)

 

Source: thediplomat.com

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending