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Jayapura Municipality Has Lowest Illiteracy Rate in Papua

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Young Papuan read magazine in Tablasupa Village, West Papua - kompasiana.com

Young Papuan read magazine in Tablasupa Village, West Papua – kompasiana.com

Jayapura, Jubi – Jayapura Municipality has the lowest illiteracy rate among the entire regencies/municipalities in Papua Province, at 0.14 percent. The illiteracy rate in Papua for 2013 was at 32.63 percent.

“Jayapura Municipality, which the human development index ratified high at the national scale and has the lowest illetaracy rate in Papua Province, deserved to obtain the literacy award from the Indonesian Minister of Education And Culture at the commemoration of the international literacy day 2015 at the national level held in Karawang, West Java,” the Papua Vice Governor Klemen Tinal said in his speech in the commemoration of the 50th International Literacy Day (HAI) and the declaration of Indonesia Reading Movement (GIM) held at the University of Cenderawasih Auditorium in Jayapura on last week.

In line with the vision and mission statements of the Governor and Vice Governor of Papua Province that Papua to be Arisen, Independent and Prosperous, he said the provincial government has succeeded to endorse the optimism and confidence in Papua. “There are eleven provinces which still have the highest illiteracy rate and the highest rank is Papua.

Off course we are not proud with this fact, but today the Papua Provincial Government and the local governments in Papua Province highly commit and believe that we can prove to other that the worst in the education field could be the best in the next five years,” he said.

The illiteracy rate in Papua for 2013 reached 32.63. It is very varied figures; several regencies in the mountainous area have the human development index under the rank of 497 at the national scale. “One of the priority programs in Papua is education program to become a right solution in the elimination of illiteracy in the entire of Papua land,” he said.

The Indonesian Minister of Education and Culture, Anies Baswedan said it’s never been late for people to learn, and they must encourage themselves to keep learning.

“We can have any position in life. It could be changed anytime, but the passion and learning activities should be kept everyday by anyone at anytime,” he said.

Therefore he asked to all stakeholders to be aware that the richness of this nation including the richness of Papuans are not grounded in their land, but in their human resources instead.
“Human resources are our biggest richness. In the past when in colonial period, in the map, Indonesia was only regarded as the producer of natural resources. Indonesia was considered as a country whose the land was exploited to produce oil, gas and other resources while its human resources were step back. Thus, the similar condition was applied for the entire country,” he said.

According to him, in the initial post-colonial period, the literacy rate in Indonesia was 5 percent; means 95 percent of Indonesian were illiterate. It was also applied for Papua. Thus, Baswedan urged the Papuans to not assume they are late to learn. “Never said Papua is too late. No. There is a stunning future in Papua. Do not talk about natural richness, but talk about the human development index. We must emphasize it,” he said.

Meanwhile the Jayapura Mayor Benhur Tommy Mano said the municipal government is continuing to battle the illiteracy in Jayapura Municipality. In 2009 the illiteracy rate in Jayapura Municipality decreased to 0.77 percent. “And in 2013, the figure was significantly decreased to 0.14 percent while in 2014 the literacy rate has reached 99.90 percent. It is the success of the PKBM (Community Learning Center) managers in providing the literacy education and educators as local government’s extension,” said Mano. (Abeth You/rom)

Health & Education Service

Kegiatan Pelatihan Ombusmen Provinsi Papua di Jayapura

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Economy

Oil Palm Plantation Seizes Indigenous’ Rights to Land and Education

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Illustration of oil palm plantation in Papua – Jubi

Jayapura, Jubi – A Papuan legislator Maria Elizabet Kaize said the oil palm investments, especially in the southern region of Papua, have seized the indigenous peoples’ lands and corrupted the education of young Papuans.

Maria Kaize, a native woman from Anim Ha customary area, said oil palm plantations give a negative impact on the indigenous children’s education in the district of Merauke, Boven Digoel and surrounding areas because the school-age Papuans prefer to follow their parents than going to school.

“It is true that the awareness among the school-aged Papuan children, especially in southern areas, for schooling needs to be improved. Many of them prefer to follow their parents in the forest,” Maria Kaize answered some questions from Jubi on Thursday (19/04/2018).

She took Bio area of Boven Digoel District as an example. In this area, many school-aged children join their parents as palm oil workers. Her sister, who is a local teacher, told her about this information.  She further said that the similar thing also happened Genyem and Lereh, Jayapura District, when the oil palm companies just operated in those areas.

“According to a teacher from Genyem whom I met some time ago, they went to the oil palm plantation for looking the children. Maybe this method can be used in some districts in the southern Papua. However, it needs support from the government, customary and church leaders as well as the community,” she said.

When meeting with Hilal Elver, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, a local leader from Keerom, Servius Servo said the transition of community land to oil palm plantation harmed the local people because it rated very cheap.  In fact, in some cases, they changed it with sugar and salt.

“Besides for oil palm plantations, community and sago forests mostly used for road construction and government infrastructure,” Servius said. (*)

Reporter: Arjuna Pademme

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Solidarity for PNG earthquake collects Rp 40 million

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General coordinator and secretary of solidarity, Samuel Awom and Kris Dogopia – Jubi / Agus Pabika.

 

Jayapura, Jubi – West Papua Solidarity for the victims of the earthquake in Papua New Guinea collected Rp 40 million and 520 thousand during fundraising held from March 15 to April 15, 2018.  Donators are individual, churches, mosques as well as other interfaith organisations. Despite cash, people also donate their wearable clothes, stated the Coordinator Samuel Awom in a press conference held at the Taburia Dormitory in Padang Bulan on Tuesday (17/4/18).

“This collected money will be sent directly to our friends in Vanimo.” The fundraising held in any part of Jayapura City, including Jayapura, Abepura, Sentani and Youtefa traditional market.

Meanwhile, the Secretary Kris Dogopia said this was an act of humanitarian solidarity without any political interests.

“We want to give a good example to Papuan people of helping others because solidarity is universal. And this is purely solidarity for humanity,” said Dogopia. (*)

 

Reporter: Aguz Pabika

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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