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LONDON PROTESTORS URGES JOKOWI TO OPEN PAPUA TO FOREIGN JOURNALISTS IF ELECTED

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Hundreds of protestors held a peaceful rally outside the Indonesian embassy in London (Tapol)

Hundreds of protestors held a peaceful rally outside the Indonesian embassy in London (Tapol)

London , 2/4 ( Jubi ) – “I spent six years in prison for calling for resistance against injustice in Burma. Now I stand here to give solidarity to the comrades in Papua who are experiencing the same thing,” said former Burmese political prisoners , Aung Ko.

Hundreds of protestors organized by TAPOL (Political Prisoners), Survival International and Amnesty International UK held a peaceful rally outside the Indonesian embassy in London on Wednesday to demand Indonesia release political prisoners in Papua and political parties and Indonesian presidential candidates to support the fulfillment of Papuans’ democratic rights.

A similar demonstration was also held in Scotland , the Netherlands , Australia , New Zealand and Papua .

In Jayapura , about 10:00 am ( local time) , police fired warning shots to disperse peaceful protestors demanding an immediate release of Papuan political prisoners. Police were heard calling the protestors “monkeys” and arrested two people people. The two protestors were allegedly mistreated and denied legal counsel while in detention at  the Jayapura police station.

In London at 13:00 pm (local time ) demonstrators represented 76 political prisoners who are currently behind bars in Papua . They were symbolically handcuffed and had their mouths covered to demonstrate restrictions on freedom of expression in Papua. Despite mounting international concerns about the political situation and human rights in Indonesia, political parties taking part in the April 9 elections still lack plans on how to resolve the conflict in Papua. Some demonstrators challenged presidential candidates to explain their programs on Papua .

Some protesters held up a signs that read: “Jokowi , foreign journalists should be allowed to enter Papua”. Another said: “Bakrie, will you release Papuan political prisoners?”
“In a letter to the Indonesian ambassador in London , HE Teuku Mohammad Hamzah Thayeb , delivered today, the organizers of the demonstration , TAPOL stated that there are 537 Papuan political prisoners in 2013. It’s twice as many as in 2012. Cases of prisoners subjected to mistreatment including  torture  are three times as high as the level in 2012, and cases of denial of access to lawyers or unfair courts have doubled from 2012, ” Paul Barber, TAPOL coordinator, told Jubi from London on Wednesday night ( 2/3).

The lack of democratic space in Papua means that the election is almost irrelevant to many people of Papua, he said.

Dominic Surabut, a Papuan political prisoner, sent a message from Abepura prison  to all demonstrators. He said:  “Freedom and democracy can not be killed and imprisoned , because the spirit is absolute and no one or no country can eliminate it. To the human rights workers and those who pro-democracy activists around the world, we cannot stay silent. We must continue to clench our hands and souls together to save and put democracy in place”.

Surabut was arrested on October 19, 2011 and is currently serving a sentence of three years in prison for his participation in a peaceful political meeting in Jayapura .

According to a report published by Papuan Behind Bars , political prisoners in Papua are often tortured to extract confessions. Many of them were beaten and subjected to cruel and degrading acts like being forced to fight each other or not given proper food or medicines. Restrictions on international organizations and foreign media working in West Papua means that many violations occur in secret , and independent reporting is almost impossible . This is a serious problem in the region known to host one of the highest concentrations of security forces in the world, the report said.

“If Indonesia does not have anything to hide in Papua , why they do not allow journalists and international organizations come to Papua ? Seventy- six political prisoners in Papua can not be hidden from the world . ” Paul Barber said .

International organizations and UN mechanisms are more and more asking on restriction of the right to freedom of expression in Papua. And this restriction is unacceptable. In November 2012 , the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention issued an opinion that the detention of Filep Karma , as long as 15 years in prison for raising the Papuan Morning Star flag is a violation of international law .

In May 2012 , at a session of the Universal Periodic Report of Human Rights ( Universal Periodic Review ) on Indonesia in the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva , the Indonesian government accepted the recommendation to invite the UN special rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression , Frank La Rue . The visit was planned for early 2013 but was canceled unilaterally by the Indonesian government. In May 2013 , the Chairman of the UN Commission on Human Rights, Navi Pillay expressed concerns about restrictions on freedom of expression in Papua.

TAPOL called on the Indonesian government to drop criminal charges against Papuan political activists and meet the international standards regarding the treatment of prisoners. ( Jubi / EC / Victor Mambor / Tina)

Arts & Culture

Taparu in Kamoro socioculture

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Kamoro women when sorting out sago caterpillars. – Jubi / Doc

Mimika, Jubi – Each clan in Kamoro has ‘taparu’ or a specific location as a place to find food sources when they encircle rivers and mangroves in the lowland estuary of Mimika District.

A Dutch anthropologist J Power states ‘taparu’ is a local terminology emphasizing the relations of land and its inhabitants. “There are also the names of surrounding neighborhoods taken from the ancestral names,” as written in a book “Taparu Fratri of Mimika-Kamoro ethnic groups in Hiripau Village, East Mimika District, Mimika Regency”, by Dessy Pola Usmany et al. from the Ministry Education and Culture Directorate General of Culture Papua Cultural Value Conservation Center, 2013.

‘Taparu’ itself is more related to groups who inhabit within this region or surrounding environment as Kamoro people always encircle the river and sago forest for catching fish or gathering food. Everyone knows their own ‘taparu’.

‘Taparu’ in Kamoro language means the land, while Sempan people call it ‘se iwake’. If someone wants to mark the land he passes in gathering food, he solely adds the prefix ‘we’ such as tumamero-we and efato-we in Omawka village.

Similarly, people in Nawaripi village also do the same. Their areas are including Tumukamiro-we, Viriao-we, and Iwiri-we. All of these names reflect the relationship between the land and inhabitants.

Meanwhile, like the majority of Kamoro people, Ojibwa people believe in the power of their late patrilineal clan that depicted in the symbols of animals. The anthropologists call these symbols with totems which mean a belief that embodies a symbolic representation of society.

Unfortunately, today taparu also face the severest challenges of sedimentation due to tailings of mining activity that cause the silting of river and discolouration of Mollusca habitat in the estuary of Mimika District. (*)

 

Reporter: Dominggus Mampioper

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Jayapura indigenous school pays attention to children’s rights

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Children in the Indigenous School learn how to carve. – Jubi / Engel Wally

Sentani, Jubi – Director of Indigenous School of Jayapura District Origen Monim stated that he would pay attention to the rights of children studying at his school as it stands in an area declared as a child-friendly village.

“We have a guide about what indicator of a child-friendly village is, which was given by the Head of the Women Empowerment and Child Protection Office. So it would be our concern,” said Monim in Sentani on Tuesday (09/11/2018).

He further explained that the indigenous school runs their activities every day, from 14:00 to 16:30 Papua time, and a speedboat provided to pick up students to school.

“So far we operate independently. In the future, we would also try to provide snacks or additional food for children in Khandei class, namely for those aged 8-13 years,” he explained.

Meanwhile, the Head of Women Empowerment and Child Protection Office of Jayapura District, Maria Bano confirmed on the guide of the child-friendly village that already implemented in the Indigenous School of Jayapura District.

“Children from formal school continue their learning activities there, in the indigenous school, which encourage children playing and having fun with their friends. Because at their age, children need to observe their environment and people around them,” said Bano. (*)

 

Reporter: Engel Wally

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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KNPB supports Kanaky for self-determination

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KNPB and Gempar Papua activists at the Secretariat of Central KNPB. – Jubi / Hengky Yeimo

Jayapura, Jubi – Central West Papua National Committee (KNPB) held a limited discussion to support FKLNS (Organization of the Liberation Struggle of the Kanaky Tribe in New Caledonia) which has been well received by the Melanesian Spearhead Group (MSG) to conduct a referendum in November 2018.

The First Chairman of Central KNPB Agus Kosay said it’s time for Kanaky to get self-determination from French colonialism.

“Kanaky must declare their self-determination. If Kanaky gets their independence, it would be able to give their support to West Papua because we share the same situation, which lives under the colonialism,” he said on Wednesday (08/12/2018) in Jayapura.

Meanwhile a member of Gempar (Papuan Youth and Student Movement) Nelius Wenda said as a nation oppressed by Indonesia, West Papua fully supports the referendum agenda of New Caledonia.

“Kanaky must determine their destiny. It must be far better than being under the French colonialism. In the future we Papuans are just like Kanaky,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: Hengky Yeimo

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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