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Morning Star Traditional Purses Jazz Up Sentani Lake Festival

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Traditional purse - wristbands and headbands with ‘Morning Star’ patterns enlivened the Sentani Lake Festival at Khalkote - Jubi/Benny Mawel

Traditional purse – wristbands and headbands with ‘Morning Star’ patterns enlivened the Sentani Lake Festival at Khalkote – Jubi/Benny Mawel

Sentani, Jubi – Trinkets such as “noken” – a traditional purse – wristbands and headbands with ‘Morning Star’ patterns enlivened the Sentani Lake Festival at Khalkote, Sentani Timur Sub-district, Jayapura Regency.

The souvenirs were easily found in both sides of the street towards the venue of festival.

“No, no one restricted us. Because we are in Papua, so we sell ‘noken’,” said a noken seller Yosephine to Jubi at the venue on Wednesday (22/6/2016).

While wiping her sweat, this smiling lady said mama-mama (indigenous women sellers) put their noken on the ground and the board because they didn’t have stalls or tent for selling their products.

“We did not get a space. We even got expelled from the venue,” she said.

But she said she didn’t know the reason why she and other sellers got expelled from there. However some sellers remained still and sell their knitting at the venue of festival, in particular at the dock of Khalkote Beach.

Eti Anou who sells noken at the left side of the entry venue of festival said she didn’t know about the exclusion. She displayed her knitting noken since the previous day.

“I only heard from other about the exclusion,” she said.

According to her no one questioned about the morning star pattern noken. Even the visitors were passing by. She admitted several years ago she was selling the morning star pattern noken in Jayapura City but being restricted by the Police. But it’s not happening in the festival this year.

“The Police also look fine,” she said.

The unique nokens are selling well.

“How could we do for living? We only can do knitting and selling pictures. That’s all,” she said. (Benny Mawel/rom)

Economy

Ambaidiru, The coffee pioneer in Papua

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Yonas Nusi showing Ambaidiru coffee – Jubi / Hengky Yeimo

Tabloid, Jubi – Saturday, 6 April 2018, legislator Yonas Nusi, who represents Saireri elected area, tells Jubi about the coffee plantations in Ambaidiru, Yapen Islands District.

He said Ambaidiru coffee plantations have existed since the Dutch era in 1959. “Missionaries –known as Zending—from the Netherlands first introduced coffee to the local people. In 1977, the Aimbaidiru community and village cooperatives continued to grow and maintain the plantations, and it lasted until the 2000s,” he said.

Aimbadiru coffee was first introduced to the local community by Zending Bink in 1924. It started widely planted in 1938. So it can be said that Ambaidiru coffee plantation is a pioneer in the development of coffee plantation in Papua.

Ambaidiru is a village located in Kosiwo Sub-district of the Ambai Islands in the south of Yapen Island. With 301.367 m2, it is approximately 4914 inhabitants live in this village. During the Dutch era, Ambaidiru was a centre for the production of robusta coffee, vanilla and vegetables.

“Coffee has a long story in Papua. People should have adequate knowledge to produce a product that can fulfil the market demand,” he said.

Moreover, he said that coffee should get attention as a high value and potential commodity for the Yapen Islands. Therefore the local government must support the local people by providing skills and management training on coffee production. So the Mayor of the Yapen Islands should able to listen to people’s aspiration, because of the source of community income affect the efforts of a community. “I support the provincial government’s efforts, particularly in Yapen Islands, to promote the potential of indigenous people in every sector, principally the economic sector.

However, another important is he asked are there among the Ambaidiru young people studying agricultural and plantation? He hopes they can finish their study and return to their village to manage the coffee plantation professionally.

A youth from Yapen Islands Markus Yoseph Imbiri said there are several problems concerning the cultivation of coffee in Ambaidiru Village, namely the low maintenance. “Ambaidiru coffee suffers the problem of increasing the number of coffee production because the trees have planted since the Dutch era,” said Imbiri.

Imbiri, who is also the Chairman of IT Volunteers, said several steps have done to grow the coffee. “People ask the government to provide more seeds to scale up the plantation,” he said.

Imbiri admitted that the government already established some agencies to support the local people. Some NGOs and cooperative named Coffee Agency are also there to help. “Some institutions are still active, but some are not. But the government support to revitalise the coffee plantations is very important,” he added. (*)

 

Reporter: Hengki Yeimo

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Economy

Papua’s endemic wood tree threatened for cooking fuel

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Illustration – Pixabay.com

Jayapura, Jubi– The population of xanthostemon novoguineensis, the endemic wood tree of Papua that locally known as ‘sowang’, nowadays has been threatened because of logging activities for cooking fuel.

“The endemic wood tree that grows in Jayapura City is continuing to extinct because of people,” said the Coordinator of the Port Numbay Greend Forum (FPPNG), Freedy Wanda to Jubi recently.

Further, he said even though an awareness campaign on the importance of sowang woods protection has done, it is not useful because indigenous people of Port Numbay are still not paying attention.

Although FPPNG has replanted some young trees, Wanda expects the Plantation and Nursery Agency could prepare as many seeds as possible.

Meanwhile, the village chief of Enggros, Orgenes Meraudje said local people are now facing difficulties with the fact that sowang woods are started to run out because people previously use it for home building.

“As now sowang woods are running out, people commonly use concretes for building their houses,” said Meraudje.

In the past, according to him, villagers had a traditional management of using sowang woods wisely; people should do a particular ritual before cutting trees, and the remarkably old trees would cut for housing. He further said houses made from the sowang woods could last for five to ten years because they are resistant to seawater and not easily broken or collapse.

Sowang wood tree mostly grows around the areas of the Mount Cycloop and Pasir Enam in Jayapura City. Unfortunately, it begins to extinct because of the needs of the household for cooking.

Sowang woods are usually for charcoals, and today because of the economic factor, those charcoals are sold to some restaurants in Jayapura City. Its well-known quality of resistance in burning process becomes the main reason why many restaurant managers prefer it for cooking fuel.

A woodcutter, Agus said he cut the sowang trees for producing charcoals. “I cut and burn it; then the charcoals are ready to sell,” he said. However, getting the sowang trees is considerably hard because they begin to extinct. So he must walk through to a very remote mountainous area. “Moving it down is also not easy because we have to go through a very poor pathway,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: David Sobolim

Editor: Pipit Maizier

 

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Economy

Oil Palm Plantation Seizes Indigenous’ Rights to Land and Education

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Illustration of oil palm plantation in Papua – Jubi

Jayapura, Jubi – A Papuan legislator Maria Elizabet Kaize said the oil palm investments, especially in the southern region of Papua, have seized the indigenous peoples’ lands and corrupted the education of young Papuans.

Maria Kaize, a native woman from Anim Ha customary area, said oil palm plantations give a negative impact on the indigenous children’s education in the district of Merauke, Boven Digoel and surrounding areas because the school-age Papuans prefer to follow their parents than going to school.

“It is true that the awareness among the school-aged Papuan children, especially in southern areas, for schooling needs to be improved. Many of them prefer to follow their parents in the forest,” Maria Kaize answered some questions from Jubi on Thursday (19/04/2018).

She took Bio area of Boven Digoel District as an example. In this area, many school-aged children join their parents as palm oil workers. Her sister, who is a local teacher, told her about this information.  She further said that the similar thing also happened Genyem and Lereh, Jayapura District, when the oil palm companies just operated in those areas.

“According to a teacher from Genyem whom I met some time ago, they went to the oil palm plantation for looking the children. Maybe this method can be used in some districts in the southern Papua. However, it needs support from the government, customary and church leaders as well as the community,” she said.

When meeting with Hilal Elver, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, a local leader from Keerom, Servius Servo said the transition of community land to oil palm plantation harmed the local people because it rated very cheap.  In fact, in some cases, they changed it with sugar and salt.

“Besides for oil palm plantations, community and sago forests mostly used for road construction and government infrastructure,” Servius said. (*)

Reporter: Arjuna Pademme

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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