Connect with us

Arts & Culture

Noken crafts, benefited economically and getting more popular

Published

on

Nahom Kotouki shows his knitted outfit – Jubi / Yance Wenda.

Sentani, Jubi – Learning to knit is not an easy thing. It looks easy, but difficult to do. But for the young man from Deiyai ​​Regency it becomes a mean to meet the needs of his life.

Nahum Kotouki, this Deiyai ​​origin young man learned to make Noken since he was still in junior high school. He knit yarn into a Noken.

“This has become our culture especially the Paniai people and has been a hereditary from our ancestor, they used to weave orchid Noken, bark noken, then the materials replaced by factory-made yarn,” he told Jubi in Pasar Pahara, Sentani, Friday (July 7).

Nahum explained he made three kinds of Noken differentiate by their materials: ordinary yarn, orchids and bark.

He has learned to make Noken since junior high, but just stared to market his craft after sitting in high school. The work can help with his tuition fees. Even then help her college tuition.

“The sale of Noken and other accessories could help me pay tuition until I finished college,” said the young man graduated from the Faculty of Engineering at Cenderawasih University.

According to Nahum working on a big Noken need two-three days, while the small one can only a day. for the motives ones can took  a week or two working days. He used to work on various motives, such as drums, cenderawasih, and the morning star.

While the type of product he made are noken, clothes, hats, earrings, bracelets, and other accessories.

The prices are vary, Noken made from factory yarn range from Rp200 thousand and above to Rp50 thousand. The highest price reach Rp500 thousand to Rp600 thousand while for accessories are rangae between Rp10 thousand to Rp30 thousand.

“My income a day is at most Rp600 thousand to Rp700 thousand and the lowest is Rp300 thousand,” said the 27-year-old guy who wants to be young entrepreneur.

Dorlllince Kotouki, Nahum’s sister said she is very proud of her younger brother that he could pursue the business of embroidered crafts which she is taught.

“I am happy because I had thaught him and now he is succeed, when we came to Jayapura I initially invited him to sell vegetables,” she said.

Papua knitted outfit in Elisabet Salon – Jubi/Agus Pabika

Elisabet Salon

Noken crafts and knitted dress are getting highly popular in Jayapura and around.

The owner of Elisabet Salon, Elisabet Ety Tebay says that in her place, the crafts are made by Papuan employees and Mama. She also ordered from the outside parties such as knitted shoes and wallet.

The prices are quite high in the Salon, which located in Perumnas 2 Waena Jayapura City. Knitted Rasta clothes reach Rp1, 5 million, while Israeli knitted motive Rp2 million, Jamaican knitted daft Rp2 million, and Brazil knitted dress Rp2 million.

While original dress made from bark can reach Rp2, 5 million, Papuan knitted dress Rp1, 5 million, green yellow knitted dress Rp1, 8 million, knitted long vest is Rp700 thousand, and rectangular knitted dress is Rp250 thousand.

” Elisabet Salon is not only serve woven, dreadlocks and hair knitted but also sells Papua speciality accessories such as bracelets, earrings, shoes to clothes (dress) are woven with a thread resembling clothes, bags, and hats with various colours and sizes,” he said .

Betty Gebse one of the customers said it’s great to see and use handicrafts of Papuan mama. She hopes young Papuan women can even more develop their creativity skills like this. (*)

Arts & Culture

Taparu in Kamoro socioculture

Published

on

By

Kamoro women when sorting out sago caterpillars. – Jubi / Doc

Mimika, Jubi – Each clan in Kamoro has ‘taparu’ or a specific location as a place to find food sources when they encircle rivers and mangroves in the lowland estuary of Mimika District.

A Dutch anthropologist J Power states ‘taparu’ is a local terminology emphasizing the relations of land and its inhabitants. “There are also the names of surrounding neighborhoods taken from the ancestral names,” as written in a book “Taparu Fratri of Mimika-Kamoro ethnic groups in Hiripau Village, East Mimika District, Mimika Regency”, by Dessy Pola Usmany et al. from the Ministry Education and Culture Directorate General of Culture Papua Cultural Value Conservation Center, 2013.

‘Taparu’ itself is more related to groups who inhabit within this region or surrounding environment as Kamoro people always encircle the river and sago forest for catching fish or gathering food. Everyone knows their own ‘taparu’.

‘Taparu’ in Kamoro language means the land, while Sempan people call it ‘se iwake’. If someone wants to mark the land he passes in gathering food, he solely adds the prefix ‘we’ such as tumamero-we and efato-we in Omawka village.

Similarly, people in Nawaripi village also do the same. Their areas are including Tumukamiro-we, Viriao-we, and Iwiri-we. All of these names reflect the relationship between the land and inhabitants.

Meanwhile, like the majority of Kamoro people, Ojibwa people believe in the power of their late patrilineal clan that depicted in the symbols of animals. The anthropologists call these symbols with totems which mean a belief that embodies a symbolic representation of society.

Unfortunately, today taparu also face the severest challenges of sedimentation due to tailings of mining activity that cause the silting of river and discolouration of Mollusca habitat in the estuary of Mimika District. (*)

 

Reporter: Dominggus Mampioper

Editor: Pipit Maizier

Continue Reading

Arts & Culture

Soedarmo: Papuan Coffee promoted in Boston and Paris

Published

on

By

The atmosphere of Papua Coffee Festival – Jubi / Alexander Loen

Jayapura, Jubi – Acting Papua Governor Soedarmo said Provincial Government is going to promote Papuan coffee to Boston and Paris shortly.

He revealed this agenda to reporters when opened the Papua Coffee Festival held in the parking of Bank Indonesia. Banks, local entrepreneurs and coffee farmers participated in this event.

“So, we are not only promoting Papuan coffee domestically but also abroad. Through our partner, we will participate in a coffee exhibition in Boston, whereas in September, I am going to send a team to participate in the exhibition held at the Eiffel Tower,” said Soedarmo on Friday (08/03/2018) in Jayapura.

According to him, the taste of Papuan coffee is not less delicious compared to coffee from other Indonesian regions or even other countries, because he has compared it with others. “I have met with the former Colombian Ambassador; then we compared Papuan coffee with Colombian coffee. But Papuan coffee is still better,” he said.

In the same place, Jayapura Mayor Benhur Tommy Mano claimed the municipal government is ready to support the provincial government in developing local commodities by promoting the local food in every event held by the municipal government.

“Indeed, we are not growing coffee here in Jayapura Municipality, but we are the biggest coffee connoisseurs,” Mano said. (*)

 

Reporter: Alexander Loen

Editor: Pipit Maizier

Continue Reading

Arts & Culture

Bark craftsmen are ready to welcome PON 2020

Published

on

By

Art Shop owned by Mince Ohee in Sentani District Jayapura. – Jubi / Yance Wenda

Sentani, Jubi – Mince Ohee, 31 years old bark craftsman from Sentani, often sell her products in front of her house where located near to the entrance of Kalkhote pier in East Sentani sub-district of Jayapura District. Approaching the national sports event held in Jayapura in 2020, she admits ready to participate by producing more bark handicrafts.

“In the next National Sports Week (PON), I will participate selling these handicrafts. But I will only sell it at the art shop,” she told Jubi in her art shop on Wednesday (08/01/2010).

Meanwhile, another craftsman Elda Natasya said whether she’s ready or not in the national event, it depends on the supply of bark materials and the market demands.

“Now barks are a bit difficult to get. So, it depends on it. If we have enough materials, we are ready to serve as many as it’d requested.” (*)

 

Reporter: Yance Wenda

Editor: Pipit Maizier

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending