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Infrastructure

Papua 58 Percent of Provincial Road Not Paved

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Road in Yahukimo District, West Papua - Jubi

Road in Yahukimo District, West Papua – Jubi

Jayapura, Jubi – Access to quality transportation to connect indigenous Papuans still leaves much to be desired, Papua Governor Lukas Enembe said. The lack of road construction is due to a budget shortfall for infrastructure that is annually allocated through the Special Autonomy funds.

According to the government, the budget shortfall up to the end of fiscal year 2015 has affected the construction of provincial roads, which are of 2,065 kilometers, 41.65 percent is solid road while 58.34 percent is the dirt road. Meanwhile, 2,682.85 kilometers of road access in the provincial road planning is still the forest areas and/or not yet constructed to connect the services center of indigenous Papuans.

Additionally, the additional budget from the Special Autonomy funds for 2016 of more than Rp 1 trillion for the road and transportation, and the Special Allocated Budget for the road of Rp 350 billion only meet the requirement of regular maintenance cost of 860 km x Rp300 million = Rp 258 billion, of periodic maintenance and asphalt improvement of 300 km x Rp 4 billion = Rp 1,2 trilion.

“It means there is 800 km of the dirt road not be maintenance,” said Elia Loupatty, the first assistant of Papua Province this week.

He measured the additional infrastructure budget from the annual budget of the Special Autonomy funds is very limited, thus it is hard to reach the target of Special Autonomy 2031 to connect the quality transportation access to the services center of indigenous Papuans.

“Therefore, this technical meeting is expected to build a synergy in the development plan between the central, provincial and regional or municipal governments in determining the priority of handling and to collectively fight for the increment of budget allocation in line with Papua Special Autonomy,” said Loupatty.

Similarly, the sector of housing and clean water development which is not becoming the public requirement also becomes a development priority, because the policy on the acceleration of the infrastructure development as well as another strategic sectors that has been determined in the vision and mission of Papua Development 2013-2018 to become a joint commitment with the government/municipal governments.

“From 80 percent of allocation budget, the regional/municipal governments obliged to allocate budget for housing construction and clean water services each year,” he said.

Meanwhile, the Head of Papua Public Works Office Mikael Kambuaya said the coordination meeting on Public Works is very important to synergy program and activities that are more measurable.

“This forum is very strategic so that target and policy goals program could be achieved in each fiscal year,” said Kambuaya. (Alexander Loen/rom)

Economy

Freeport’s one percent fund cannot guarantee Kamoro’s future

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Mathea Mamayou, a native Kamoro woman whose tribe affected tailings produced by PT Freeport Indonesia. – Jubi / Doc

Jayapura, Jubi – The Secretary for the Government, Politics, Law and Human Rights Commission of the Papua House of Representatives Mathea Mamoyao, who is also a Kamoro native, said ‘one percent fund’, 1% of Freeport’s gross revenues go to the local tribes, does not guarantee the sustainable future of those tribes.

“I don’t know whether this compensation is still there or not. I don’t want certain people took advantages on it, while people are still living under the poverty,” she told Jubi on Wednesday (18/7/2018).

Further, she said what she wants is a guarantee for the Kamoro tribe to live in a better condition in the future. But the fact is the education and health services in the Kamoro region is still poor. “For all the times, I’ll keep talking about it, because as a native, I don’t want the young generation of my tribe not to survive in the future,” she said.

Meanwhile, the board of Meepago Customary Council John NR Gobai said indigenous peoples as the tenure landowners collect the promise of the Indonesian Government on the bargain involved Freeport, the Central Government and the landowners on 4 September 2017.

“At that time, the Minister of Energy and Mineral Resources Ignatius Jonan agreed to accommodate the request of Amungme tribe asking Freeport to give a reimbursement of 1% fund which they received as the Corporate Social Responsibly funds into larger value shares,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: Arjuna Pademme

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Headlines

Provincial health team takes more rest than work, says Kopkedat

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GIDI church missionaries, pastor and Kopkedat Papua provide public health services in Okmakot Village, Seradala Sub-district, Yahukimo District. – Jubi/Agus Pabika

Jayapura, Jubi – Chairman of Humanitarian Care Community for Remote Areas Papua (Kopkedat) Yan Akobiarek states despite education, public health services in Papua’s remote areas are still an issue.

Although the provincial health office has provided services to remote areas through several health programs such as Satgas Kaki Telanjang, Save Korowai and Nusantara Sehat, these programs have not well implemented.

“I think sending teams to remote areas is a good idea, but I get the impression that some team members only come for vacation, to work less and get more rest,” said Akobiarek told Jubi by phone on Tuesday (10/7/2018). For instance, he pointed out the team of Satgas Kaki Telanjang who are supposed to provide health service to villagers in Korowai. After the Ied al-Ftir break, their members are still not returning to their duty station.

Meanwhile, Maria Duwitau, the Vice Chairman of the Commission V on education and health of the Papuan House of Representative said doing health services in Papua, in particularly remote areas, is always connecting with a commitment. “No matter how greater of the offer, but without willingness and commitment, I think it’s useless,” Duwitau told Jubi not long ago. (*)

 

Reporter: Arjuna Pademme

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Economy

Where does Rp 9.56 billion for Panggama Airport’s construction go?

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Papuan Legislator Natan Pahabol (blue shirt) with the Yahukimo community. – Jubi / Doc

Jayapura, Jubi – Papuan legislator from Yahukimo, Yalimo and Pegunungan Bintang electoral districts Natan Pahabol questioned the funds allocated for the airport construction in Panggama Sub-district Yahukimo.

He said the Papua Provincial Government allocated Rp 11.95 billion in 2016 to renovate the Panggama Airport. The amount of Rp 9.56 billion has disbursed to the contractor in the fiscal year 2017. In the same year, the contractor began to work on the former airport that was built by missionaries from the European Evangelical Agency around 1972-1973 in collaboration with the GKI Synod in Tanah Papua under the leadership of the Rev. Adam Roth.

“After that, the work discarded and until now the airport has not finished. So when it rains so heavy, the airport is flooded. By this year it cannot be used,” said Pahabol to Jubi on Friday (6/7/2018).

Further, he said during this time, the local community, especially the church workers from GKI Yalimo and Anggruk depend on this airport for their only access in and out of the region by using the small-bodied aircraft. Now, their access has obstructed due to the construction.

“We are questioning to the Public Works Office, who’s responsible for the airport’s construction? The airport is for the public access, so we hope the office could immediately find out who the contractor is?” he said.

Another Papuan legislator, John NR Gobai said it is not just the Panggama Airport but infrastructure development in some areas, especially in Papua has not finished for years. “For instance, Karang Tumarisita Bridge in Nabire District. It has not finished for three years, and it’s a responsibility of the government agency,” he said. (*)

Reporter: Arjuna Pademme

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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