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Papua Friends of the Earth: “Special regulation on Papua forest protection, before anything else”

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Children playing in a piece of remain land inside palm oil plantation – IST

Jayapura, Jubi – Delays in granting new licenses and improvements in management of primary natural forest and peat land are a policy that required commitment from multi-stakeholders in order to postpone number of proposed forest utilization new licenses.

This is important in order to reduce carbon emissions of forest degradation and deforestation in Indonesia, as stated by Friends of the Earth (Walhi) Papua in its press release recently.

“The SBY government has issued Presidential Instruction No. 6/2013 regarding the postponement of new licenses to improve the management of natural forests and peat lands,” said Aiesh Rumbekwan, Director of Walhi Regio Papua and West Papua in a press conference on Friday (May 12) .

Rumbekwan said President Jokowi’s stated his commitment in a speech at the conference of the parties (COP 21 UNFCCC) in Paris 2015. He promised to commit to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 29 percent Business as usual in 2030 and 41 percent with international support.

This commitment is downgraded by Presidential Instruction No. 8/2017 that would delays the granting new licenses and improvements in primary natural forest and peat land management.

“This is done after seeing the fact that expansion of extractive industry on primary natural forest and peat lands continues to occur and tends to increase over time,” he told to the press.

He added despite the policy of moratorium on forest and peat land utilization’s permit, the fact that expansion of extractive industry in Papua is still quite high, especially on oil palm plantation sector.

So far, it seems that there is no certainty that there will be any extension of delay or reduction or even cessation of extractive industry expansion on primary natural forest and peat land in Papua, according to the essence of the moratorium. Meanwhile, he said presidential instruction No.8 / 2015 itself end on May 13 2017.

“The new permits issued by the government to extractive industries, especially oil palm plantations and mining in the period of postponement/moratorium are considered to be a form of political economic conspiracy between corporations and the government. The example of what happened between PTPN II Arso and indigenous people in Keerom is the proof, “Rumbekwan said.

This is followed by the issuance of PP 13/2017 on the amendment to PP No.26 / 2008 on the national spatial plan which is considered as inconsistent with Indonesia commitment and international.

Meanwhile, according to Foker NGO Papua, Decky Rumaropen the impact that will occur is the granting of licenses without complying with the policy of moratorium will raises resistance of indigenous peoples to defend their rights to land and natural resources which are often politicized with criminalization.

“The fact that many people who are victims of investment by government and corporation lose their land right and management rights, especially natural resources as their livelihood,” said Rumaropen.

Observing the condition, Walhi and Foker Papua NGOs asked the Papuan and West Papua governments to stop recommending extractive industrial companies to invest in Papua. It considered does not provide any benefit to the indigenous people.

Walhi Papua and Foker NGO Papua will fight against the potential of forest degradation and deforestation that increasingly leads to prolonged conflict among the people that even cost lives.

Furthermore, they requested the Government of Papua and West Papua to make a real effort through local regulation in order to save the people and forests of Papua and build strategic partnership with the community for forest management in Papua.

There should be concrete efforts to urge the central government, especially the Ministry of Environment and Forestry (KLHK) to issue a standard of procedure and criteria (NSPK) in the implementation of Perdasus (special regulation in Papua Special Autonomy Law) No 21./2008 on more sustainable forest management in Papua to recognize indigenous peoples’ rights to forests in Papua.

“For the governor of West Papua together with the relevant agencies to immediately issue Perdasus to implement the Special Autonomy Law in connection with sustainable management in the Province of West Papua by ensuring the customary rights of Papua’s forests,” said Aiesh Rumbekwan.(*)

Reporter: David Sobolim

Editor: Zely Ariane

Arts & Culture

Taparu in Kamoro socioculture

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Kamoro women when sorting out sago caterpillars. – Jubi / Doc

Mimika, Jubi – Each clan in Kamoro has ‘taparu’ or a specific location as a place to find food sources when they encircle rivers and mangroves in the lowland estuary of Mimika District.

A Dutch anthropologist J Power states ‘taparu’ is a local terminology emphasizing the relations of land and its inhabitants. “There are also the names of surrounding neighborhoods taken from the ancestral names,” as written in a book “Taparu Fratri of Mimika-Kamoro ethnic groups in Hiripau Village, East Mimika District, Mimika Regency”, by Dessy Pola Usmany et al. from the Ministry Education and Culture Directorate General of Culture Papua Cultural Value Conservation Center, 2013.

‘Taparu’ itself is more related to groups who inhabit within this region or surrounding environment as Kamoro people always encircle the river and sago forest for catching fish or gathering food. Everyone knows their own ‘taparu’.

‘Taparu’ in Kamoro language means the land, while Sempan people call it ‘se iwake’. If someone wants to mark the land he passes in gathering food, he solely adds the prefix ‘we’ such as tumamero-we and efato-we in Omawka village.

Similarly, people in Nawaripi village also do the same. Their areas are including Tumukamiro-we, Viriao-we, and Iwiri-we. All of these names reflect the relationship between the land and inhabitants.

Meanwhile, like the majority of Kamoro people, Ojibwa people believe in the power of their late patrilineal clan that depicted in the symbols of animals. The anthropologists call these symbols with totems which mean a belief that embodies a symbolic representation of society.

Unfortunately, today taparu also face the severest challenges of sedimentation due to tailings of mining activity that cause the silting of river and discolouration of Mollusca habitat in the estuary of Mimika District. (*)

 

Reporter: Dominggus Mampioper

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Avoiding conflicts of interest on indigenous land mapping

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The finalization of the formation of task force team for indigenous areas mapping in Jayapura District. -Jubi/Doc

Jayapura, Jubi – The indigenous land mapping in Jayapura District is very important, but it should be noted that it might have a tendency of contestation or conflict of interest among communities.

According to an anthropologist at the University of Papua I Ngurah Suryawan, the claim of land has a long history of dynamic and inconsistent movements. It needs a thorough study of the form of the indigenous land mapping, as it is inherent in the rights of indigenous people.

“Speaking of this, the indigenous people’s land’s right is currently facing a strong onslaught of change. “People are busy talking about land rights, but then they just see how their land was taken by companies, their relatives or other clans of family,” said Ngurah on Thursday (9/6/2018).

Meanwhile, Jayapura Regent Mathius Awoitauw has also formed a task force to do mapping on the indigenous territories. The task force chaired the Regional Secretary of Jayapura District which members are including the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN), NGOs and indigenous communities.

“The task force was launched on Friday (5/9/2018) after many consultation and finalization among members and communities.” (*)

 

Reporter: Timoteus Marten

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Environment

Two hectares of forest area burned in Wasur National Park

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Forest fires in Wasur National Park area, Merauke Regency. – Jubi / Frans L Kobun

Merauke, Jubi – Eleven firefighters of the Firefighter Brigade of Forest and Land Control of Merauke was trying to put out of the fire on Wasur National Park area following the forest fires in the past few days.

Sukamto, the Head of Firefighter Brigade told reporters on Friday (7/9/2018) that the forest fires in Wasur National Park were identified yesterday so that his team went to the fire spot immediately.

He explained that approximately two hectares of forest area in Wasur National Park burned, although the firefighter team tried to blackouts of fire using both manual and semi-mechanics water pumps. “We don’t know yet what caused the fire. However, it is more likely the human’s factor,” he said.

Meanwhile, Sota Police Chief the Adjunct Police Commissionaire Ma’ruf states the police have provided an understanding to local communities in villages to encourage people not to burn the forest in dry season.

“If this habit still continues, it might give a negative impact on the forest ecosystems,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: Frans L Kobun

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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