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Papua Legislative Council to Form Special Committee to Handle Freeport’s Mining Boundaries

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The office of Papua Legislative Council - Jubi

The office of Papua Legislative Council – Jubi

Jayapura, Jubi – Papua Legislative Council will form two special committees to tackle the issue of territorial borders and mining boundaries in Papua.

Papua legislator Thomas Sondegau said these committees would respectively handle the Freeport’s mining boundary and regional/municipal border areas.

“Freeport’s Boundary Committee will handle the Freeport’s mining boundary. For instance, to manage the boundary between Mimika Regency and Puncak, Nduga,

Paniai and Intan Jaya. It is also to observe the Freeport’s expansion area, whether it goes to other regional border area or so on. During the time people only knew that Freeport operates in Amungme and Kamoro tribes’ territory,” Sondegau said on Wednesday (20/1/2016).

While, according to him, the Freeport’s underground mining area has crossed to other tribe’s territory such as Moni’s territory in Intan Jaya Regency, Nduga’s in Nduga Regency, Mee’s in Paniai Regency and Dani’s in Puncak.

“Do not only refer to Freeport’s open mining area, but also its underground mining area. The special committees are established to look further on Freeport’s mining area whether it is still in the Amungme’s territory or already cross to others’ territory,” he said.

He said if it has cleared, Papua Legislative Council will coordinated with the regional governments and relevant tribes as well in order to accommodate the customary communities’ interest.

“The establishment of Special Committee had decided in the Papua Parliament’s plenary last year. Five of seven fractions of Papua Legislative Council approved it, namely Hanura, Democrat, PDI Perjuangan, PKB and Golkar,” he said.

Meanwhile the Deputy Chairman of Commission I of Papua Legislative Council, Orgenes Wanimbo Tolli Wone said the Commission I will concern to resolve many disputes related to boundary issues involved regencies/municipal in Papua. (Arjuna Pademme/rom)

Environment

WWF promotes customary map in Tambrauw

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Training participant on a mapping of primary sites of indigenous peoples in Tambraw District by WWF Indonesia Program Papua – Jubi / doc WWF.

 

Tambrauw, Jubi – WWF Indonesia Papua Program is mapping the indigenous peoples’ landmark with 1: 50,000 scale to support the preparation of the Spacial Plan of Tambrauw District, West Papua Province.

The two-day training conducted on 17 – 18 May 2018 in Sausapor is also aimed to build a partnership with the local government and other institutions who have a similar concern in mapping.

WWF Indonesia Program Coordinator Wika A. Rumbiak said that the mapping of primary sites in Tambraw District is a series of the process of socio-cultural and spatial mappings which conducted to show representative of indigenous people’s space pattern.

“Hopefully, this participatory mapping can accommodate the rights of the community in spatial planning, which stated in Article 2 of Government Regulation (PP) No. 69 of 1996,” said Wika, Saturday (19/5/2018).

The training result, said Wika, is a common understanding about developing a rational and measurable planning method. That is by applying participatory mapping and the development of expertise and knowledge, in processing spatial data with GIS (Geospatial Information System).

The training involves some related regional government offices including the Village and Community Development Office (Dinas Pemberdayaan Masyarakat and Kampung), the Environment Office, Regional Development and Planning Board, and the Tambrauw Forestry Office.

“The involvement of regional government offices in this training is to prepare the participatory mapping facilitators and to improve their knowledge on Geospatial Information System (GIS) for inputting spatial data entries,” said Wika. (*)

Reporter: Hans Kapisa

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Environment

No notification, indigenous landowners are victimized

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The Chairman of Tenure Right Special Committee, Nathaniel Paliting take a picture with indigenous landowners from Kaptel Sub-district – Jubi/Frans L Kobun

Jayapura, Jubi – Dozens of people from eight clans in Kaptel Sub-district, Merauke headed by the Sub-district Chief Wister Hutapea came to the local parliament office on Monday, 30 April 2018 to meet the Chairman of Tenure Right Special Committee Nathaniel Paliting and two representatives of PT Nufta.

A clan chief Lukas Samkakai revealed that since 2011, PT Nutfa opened the land for the industrial planting forest. However, the company never announced their land clearing activity to the eight clans of the landowners. People then complained the 1300 hectares of planned 65,000 hectares of land clearing by the company. As a result, the company agreed to meet the community and agreed to pay Rp 300 million compensation.

“We agreed with the price and the company gave us Rp 20 million in October 2017. Then, they promised to pay the rest of amount in the near There is no response or further follow up after this payment,” said Samkakai. After waiting for so long, they decided to come to the Merauke Regional Council Office.

The Chief of Kaptel Sub-district, Wister Hutapea admitted the company cleared the land of the two clans so far, but not yet the six clans’. As a sub-district chief, I absolutely cannot be silent; I have to support the indigenous landowners’ rights,” he said. Therefore, he expects the regional council of Merauke can accommodate people by forcing the company to pay such compensation. If not people will be complaining and it would affect the company’s operation.

Meanwhile, the Chairman of Tenure Right Special Committee, Nathaniel Paliting said the meeting between the council and representatives of eight clans and company representatives was a follow up of the visit of councillors to Kampung Boepe a few times ago.

“We facilitated this meeting to enable these representatives to sit together and talk. As a response, the two representatives of PT Nutfa said they have to ask further guidance from their director in Jakarta,” he said.

The council, further Paliting said, gives three days for the company to settle their response towards the people’s demand.

“I listened to the company’s talk that there is an agreement between the company and community about the land clearing in 2011,” he said.

Based on this evidence, the committee asked the company to provide the agreement for further review. “We don’t know about it in detail. They must present the contract upon us for taking immediate steps so that people from the eight clans would not be in the same situation anymore,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: Frans Kobun

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Economy

Papua’s endemic wood tree threatened for cooking fuel

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Illustration – Pixabay.com

Jayapura, Jubi– The population of xanthostemon novoguineensis, the endemic wood tree of Papua that locally known as ‘sowang’, nowadays has been threatened because of logging activities for cooking fuel.

“The endemic wood tree that grows in Jayapura City is continuing to extinct because of people,” said the Coordinator of the Port Numbay Greend Forum (FPPNG), Freedy Wanda to Jubi recently.

Further, he said even though an awareness campaign on the importance of sowang woods protection has done, it is not useful because indigenous people of Port Numbay are still not paying attention.

Although FPPNG has replanted some young trees, Wanda expects the Plantation and Nursery Agency could prepare as many seeds as possible.

Meanwhile, the village chief of Enggros, Orgenes Meraudje said local people are now facing difficulties with the fact that sowang woods are started to run out because people previously use it for home building.

“As now sowang woods are running out, people commonly use concretes for building their houses,” said Meraudje.

In the past, according to him, villagers had a traditional management of using sowang woods wisely; people should do a particular ritual before cutting trees, and the remarkably old trees would cut for housing. He further said houses made from the sowang woods could last for five to ten years because they are resistant to seawater and not easily broken or collapse.

Sowang wood tree mostly grows around the areas of the Mount Cycloop and Pasir Enam in Jayapura City. Unfortunately, it begins to extinct because of the needs of the household for cooking.

Sowang woods are usually for charcoals, and today because of the economic factor, those charcoals are sold to some restaurants in Jayapura City. Its well-known quality of resistance in burning process becomes the main reason why many restaurant managers prefer it for cooking fuel.

A woodcutter, Agus said he cut the sowang trees for producing charcoals. “I cut and burn it; then the charcoals are ready to sell,” he said. However, getting the sowang trees is considerably hard because they begin to extinct. So he must walk through to a very remote mountainous area. “Moving it down is also not easy because we have to go through a very poor pathway,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: David Sobolim

Editor: Pipit Maizier

 

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