Connect with us

Environment

Recognising land and tenure rights isthe best way to protect Papua’s forest

Published

on

Customary ceremoni in Miyah tribe of tambrauw, West Papua – IUCN

Jayapura, Jubi – The forests of Papua in Indonesia have been referred to as a last frontier, and those that live in and around them are instrumental in their future. Clarifying and codifying rights to tenure and management may be the key to keeping these forests standing.

Papua’s deforestation and forest degradation rates are below the national average, and these areas contain around half of Indonesia’s primary forests. This translates to the encouraging reality that Papua is largely preserving its forests, and indigenous communities play a big role in this paradigm. However, the tides of change are inevitable and recognising land and tenure rights while engaging communities in forest management is seen as the best way to maintain these amazing landscapes.

As in many countries, top-down planning in Indonesia has historically contributed to the marginalisation of customary communities from forest-related planning and negotiations. To help address this, Indonesia has set up forest management units that function as decentralised entities run by local governments. They are charged with the planning, management, investment, monitoring and evaluation of forests under their authority. Forest management units have been an effective framework for the promotion of the role of communities as the main actors in managing forest resources.

Working through these entities, IUCN partnered with The Samdhana Institute in Indonesia’s Papua and West Papua Provinces to enhance community land rights and encourage low emissions development plans. These REDD+ focused initiatives included customary boundary mapping, promotion of livelihood-enhancing options, advocacy for regulatory changes, locally-controlled forest management, and capacity building.

Ignasius Baru, Chairman of the tribal customs of Miyah, Tambrauw District said implementation sites represent different ecological areas found across Papua-Indonesia: Baliem Valley is a high-land ecosystem, 1,500 metres above sea level; Balik is a typical small island of Papua; and Tambrauw is a low land, coastal mountains landscape. Work has expanded to new forest and land development issues including the protection of local rights, and benefits for local peoples.

The Papua Project Coordinator for Samdhana, Yunus Yumte summarised the goals of the project as: 1) to foster clarification and recognition of indigenous peoples’ rights;2) to integrate how the communities perceive of the their living space and their preparedness to manage forests based on government planning; and 3) to develop indigenous people-based natural resources management within a legal system and with sustainable values.

“Customary boundary mapping is central to the entire project. When mapping is done collectively, it is a way to preserve local people’s rights, and manage collaboratively,” Yunus said.

He explained maps that identify customary boundaries and ownership of land are essential tools for land and resource planning, resolving disputes, and educating younger generations on community rights.

In Papua Province, communities now have customary boundary maps that cover almost two million hectares. In Tambrauw, a methodology for indicative customary boundary mapping has been tested and endorsed. This methodology is providing a new and rapid approach to mapping tribe and sub-tribe boundaries in order to accelerate legal recognition, and secure the rights of indigenous people.

“These customary boundary maps are catalysing discussions on strong claims of customary rights over the land and forests, how the community’s current activities affect the forest and what changes could be made, innovative approaches on conservation development to reduce emissions, and how protect and enhance carbon stocks,” Ignasius Baru said. (Victor Mambor/IUCN)

Environment

Freeport, the entrance to evaluates all investments in Papua

Published

on

By

Demonstration held by Papua Community Solidarity Forum Freeport (FMPPF) in Papua House of Representatives Office, Thursday, 9 August 2018. – Jubi / Arjuna Pademme

Jayapura, Jubi – Second Deputy Chairperson of Papua House of Representatives Fernando Yansen A Tinal said PT Freeport Indonesia is the entrance to evaluate all companies that invest in Papua.

“I have captured the points that there is a need to be open and involved the indigenous Papuans as the landowners in every investment in Papua,” he said after the meeting with Papua Community Solidarity Forum (FMPPF) who held a rally in the parking of Papua House of Representative on Thursday (9 / 8/2018).

So far, he added, every negotiation with PTFI has almost not involved the indigenous people.

In the rally which coincided with the commemoration of the International Indigenous Day, the FMPPF chairman Samuel Tabuni and the field coordinator Yusak Andato read 12 points of statements in public. One of the points is requesting the Papua House of Representative and the Papua People’s Assembly to establish a special commission to evaluate all national and international investment operating in the land of Papua, particularly PT Freeport Indonesia in Timika and British Petroleum in Sorong, West Papua Province. (*)

 

Reporter: Arjuna Pademme

Editor: Pipit Maizier

Continue Reading

Environment

Papuan Film Festival pictures the voiceless

Published

on

By

Jayapura Deputy Mayor of Jayapura Rustan Saru (in the centre) photographed with the Chairperson of FFP II Organizing Committee Harun Rumbarar (in the right) and one of the visitors. – Jubi / Hengky Yeimo

Jayapura, Jubi – Jayapura City, Tuesday, 7 August 2018, visitors crowded in Lokabudaya Expo Museum Waena, Heram sub-district to attend the Papua Film Festival held by a film community Papuan Voice for three days from 7 to 9 August 2018.

A festival participant Mecky Yeimo said the films screened in the festival provide a lot of information about the land disputes between native landowners and investors. “I am happy because as Papuans we can get a lot of information about the deprivation of the rights of indigenous people in Papua,” he said.

Further, he said Papuans are commonly known for their culture of oral tradition, and the information in the films becomes an interesting issue to discuss in the future.

Meanwhile, the chairman of Pusaka Foundation Frangky Samperante, who met Jubi at the same place, said FFP is a forum where people can find out the facts that occurred in many areas in Papua. “Films can be the basis for people to make a judgment based on the information they see and hear,” said Samperante.

Furthermore, he considered this film community could become an agent for Papuans to voice their aspirations and to express their expressions. (*)

 

Reporter: Hengky Yeimo

Editor: Pipit Maizier

Continue Reading

Environment

Marine debris affect fish quality in Jayapura

Published

on

By

A fisherman moored his boat in Engros, Youtefa. – Jubi / Agus Pabika

Jayapura, Jubi – Womsumbro, a fisherman who’s one of the recipients of the Cold Chain System (SRD), told Jubi that the household rubbish from the city residents become a problem for some fishermen as it pollutes the marine habitat.

“When we run our boats, the machine is often stuck because it hit the garbage. There are many types of marine debris such as plastic bottles, disposable diapers or sanitary napkins which also affect the quality of the fish we caught,” he said on Tuesday (07/31/2018).

Meanwhile, Jayapura Deputy Mayor H. Rustan Saru hopes the SRD program by Jayapura Municipal Government via the Fisheries Office can improve the quality of the fish.

“We should ensure that the quality of fish for the market or human consumption is good. The rubbish has not just created a problem but also reduced the quality of fish.” (*)

 

Reporter: Agus Pabika

Editor: Pipit Maizier

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending