Connect with us

Economy

A Story of ‘Pasar Mama-Papua Papua’ in the 108th Anniversary of Jayapura City

Published

on

Caption: Pasar Mama-Mama Papua in Jalan Percetakan, Kelurahan Imbi, Jayapura Utara Sub-district, Jayapura City. – Jubi/Dok

Jayapura, Jubi – On 7 March 2018, in celebration of the 108th anniversary of Jayapura City, the Mayor of Jayapura City Benhur Tomi Mano launched Pasar Mama-Mama Papua, a traditional market that especially accommodating Papuan women traders.

This fourth-floor semi-modern market is built on an area of 2,400 square meters, which is located in Jalan Percetakan, Jayapura Utara Sub-district. It reflects a triumph of Papuan trader women who united in the Solidarity for indigenous women traders (Solpap) since 2003.

It started 14 years ago when some indigenous traders asked the Papua Provincial Government to provide a permanent market. They were never tired to speak out their voice. As a result, the provincial government built a temporary market which location is about 300 meters from the current permanent market. However, this does not answer their demand.

The traders were still asking their aspiration of the permanent market to the provincial government and Papua House of Representative.

A new hope arose in 2014. When Joko Widodo (Jokowi) was elected to be the President of Indonesia, he promised to build a permanent market. Their long waiting has been come true at last. On 30 April 2016, Jokowi put the first stone of this building. The market was completed in the early of 2017. Unfortunately, it couldn’t be occupied by women traders for some reasons. Despite not being yet inaugurated, one of the obstacles is a charge from landowners who claim for payment over their land. However, Papuan legislator John NR Gobai, who previously worked with Solpap in declaring these women’s aspiration, said nothing should be worried about.

“It is a mayor’s responsibility. As a native of Port Numbay (another name of Jayapura City), I believe he knew what he supposed to do,” said Gobai to Jubi on Tuesday (6/3/2018). According to him, in respect of the land tenure rights, traders from Port Numbai should be given a place in the market. This has been discussed with the municipal government in a meeting with Solpap and indigenous women traders recently. He further said it has become a common law that the owners of the territory will claim their rights. As long as they can be empowered, then it must be done.

“We will accommodate this, so everything can be well run. Furthermore, Solpap has always put a dialogue in the first place,” he said. The Papua House of Representative, according to him, will encourage the government in nurturing the indigenous women traders. In addition, the Papua Governor Lukas Enembe has made a breakthrough by providing a financial support for Papuan Trade Chamber (KAPP) to develop the community-based economy.

“We will definitely go with the government to implement the empowerment of Papua indigenous traders,” he said. In addition to the government, he added, the Bank of Papua is also expected to take a role by providing low-interest rate credits to Papuan indigenous traders.

He reminds the municipal government to not monopolize the management of the market. As a partner, Solpap has been assisted the indigenous women traders for 14 years. So it should be given a trust. “Solpap should be compensated with a trust for their 14 years works. Every shortcomings and mistake are common. Therefore, the partnership between Solpan and municipal government is legitimate. There should be a regional regulation, municipal regulation and other legal products to be established,” said Gobai.

Solpap Coordinator Franky Warer said Solpap is ready to carry out a mandate in providing assistance to the indigenous women traders in the market. According to him, this is not a new task because they have worked and fought together.

And now, when their struggle has been successful, Solpap would not let the women traders walk alone. “Based on our last conversation with the mayor, he said there would be a program for the women traders. Solpap would be more focus on the empowerment or capacity building of women traders,” said Warer.

Meanwhile, Solpap Secretary Natan Tebai agreed with John NR Gobai. He expected the municipal government doesn’t ignore the existence of Solpap because it has played a big role in the realization of the market.

In a meeting between Solpap, the mayor and the representative of Jayapura Municipal Industry and Trade Office on 2 March 2018, it is agreed that Solpap would handle the market management. He expected there is a regional regulation to legitimate Solpap as a partner of the government, while the government should deal with the maintenance of building and administration.

He further said the women traders do not want the municipal government to change the role of Solpap, because Solpap has been with them all the times. “Solpap see the government as a partner. We are here to help the government in assisting the women traders, not to oppose it,” said Tebai. (*)

 

Reporter: Arjuna Pademme

Editor: Pipit Maizier

Economy

Papua’s endemic wood tree threatened for cooking fuel

Published

on

By

 

Illustration – Pixabay.com

Jayapura, Jubi– The population of xanthostemon novoguineensis, the endemic wood tree of Papua that locally known as ‘sowang’, nowadays has been threatened because of logging activities for cooking fuel.

“The endemic wood tree that grows in Jayapura City is continuing to extinct because of people,” said the Coordinator of the Port Numbay Greend Forum (FPPNG), Freedy Wanda to Jubi recently.

Further, he said even though an awareness campaign on the importance of sowang woods protection has done, it is not useful because indigenous people of Port Numbay are still not paying attention.

Although FPPNG has replanted some young trees, Wanda expects the Plantation and Nursery Agency could prepare as many seeds as possible.

Meanwhile, the village chief of Enggros, Orgenes Meraudje said local people are now facing difficulties with the fact that sowang woods are started to run out because people previously use it for home building.

“As now sowang woods are running out, people commonly use concretes for building their houses,” said Meraudje.

In the past, according to him, villagers had a traditional management of using sowang woods wisely; people should do a particular ritual before cutting trees, and the remarkably old trees would cut for housing. He further said houses made from the sowang woods could last for five to ten years because they are resistant to seawater and not easily broken or collapse.

Sowang wood tree mostly grows around the areas of the Mount Cycloop and Pasir Enam in Jayapura City. Unfortunately, it begins to extinct because of the needs of the household for cooking.

Sowang woods are usually for charcoals, and today because of the economic factor, those charcoals are sold to some restaurants in Jayapura City. Its well-known quality of resistance in burning process becomes the main reason why many restaurant managers prefer it for cooking fuel.

A woodcutter, Agus said he cut the sowang trees for producing charcoals. “I cut and burn it; then the charcoals are ready to sell,” he said. However, getting the sowang trees is considerably hard because they begin to extinct. So he must walk through to a very remote mountainous area. “Moving it down is also not easy because we have to go through a very poor pathway,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: David Sobolim

Editor: Pipit Maizier

 

Continue Reading

Economy

Oil Palm Plantation Seizes Indigenous’ Rights to Land and Education

Published

on

By

Illustration of oil palm plantation in Papua – Jubi

Jayapura, Jubi – A Papuan legislator Maria Elizabet Kaize said the oil palm investments, especially in the southern region of Papua, have seized the indigenous peoples’ lands and corrupted the education of young Papuans.

Maria Kaize, a native woman from Anim Ha customary area, said oil palm plantations give a negative impact on the indigenous children’s education in the district of Merauke, Boven Digoel and surrounding areas because the school-age Papuans prefer to follow their parents than going to school.

“It is true that the awareness among the school-aged Papuan children, especially in southern areas, for schooling needs to be improved. Many of them prefer to follow their parents in the forest,” Maria Kaize answered some questions from Jubi on Thursday (19/04/2018).

She took Bio area of Boven Digoel District as an example. In this area, many school-aged children join their parents as palm oil workers. Her sister, who is a local teacher, told her about this information.  She further said that the similar thing also happened Genyem and Lereh, Jayapura District, when the oil palm companies just operated in those areas.

“According to a teacher from Genyem whom I met some time ago, they went to the oil palm plantation for looking the children. Maybe this method can be used in some districts in the southern Papua. However, it needs support from the government, customary and church leaders as well as the community,” she said.

When meeting with Hilal Elver, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, a local leader from Keerom, Servius Servo said the transition of community land to oil palm plantation harmed the local people because it rated very cheap.  In fact, in some cases, they changed it with sugar and salt.

“Besides for oil palm plantations, community and sago forests mostly used for road construction and government infrastructure,” Servius said. (*)

Reporter: Arjuna Pademme

Editor: Pipit Maizier

Continue Reading

Economy

Government Put Rice on Priority Rather than Papuan Local Food

Published

on

By

Papuan local food – Jubi

Jayapura, Jubi – Anthropology lecturer at the University of Cendrawasih, Jack Morin said that the government’s investment and programs are some factors in eliminating Papuan staple food.

According to him, the distribution of Rastra (rice for poor), village funds and other development programs affect the activity of indigenous Papuans in rural areas. As a result, people are less concerned about the existence of their local food. Moreover, oil palm plantations, mining areas, and other business investment have affected the availability of agriculture lands; he told Jubi on Wednesday (18/4/2018).

It is worrying, he added, this condition would lead to the problem of food security. The government has an important role to ensure that local food continues to be dominant in the community because it has everything: power, money and knowledge. With human resources it has, the government should be able to maintain the existence of local food in each region.

“It is necessary to encourage both governor and regents to be aware concerning this matter,” he said. However, he also reminds the community to be aware of their land and the potential of their local food. “Do not be consumed by investment or government’s policy;  people should maintain the sustainability of local food,” he said.

The Head of Agricultural and Horticultural Agency of Papua Province, Semuel Siriwa said the Papua Provincial Government concern about local food development. It already stipulates a policy requiring all government agencies to serve local food in meetings or events. He said this governor’s instruction is part of government’s efforts to develop food security.

“This instruction should be implemented by all government agencies. Economically, it will increase income, as well as the stability of local food security. If it occurs, farmers will be more motivated because the market is ready,” said Siriwa

The Head of the Food Security and Coordination Agency for Provincial Representative Office of Papua, Roberth Eddy Purwoko said his office would further improve local food development programs, ranging from home-scale plantation such as a home garden that can provide sustainable food.  “Local food would certainly reduce demands on food supplies from other regions,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: Arjuna Pademme

Editor: Pipit Maizier

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending