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Tolikara Incident : One Killed and 11 Wounded

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GIDI's members were injured in hospital after the incident - Jubi

GIDI’s members were injured in hospital after the incident – Jubi

Jayapura, Jubi – The Indonesian Fellowship of Churches and Evangelical institutions (PGLII) has condemned the destruction and arson attack on an Islamic house of prayer (mushola) on Friday, along with kiosks and homes in Tolikara district, Papua.

“PGLII deplored the incident that hurt inter-religious harmony and the holiness of Idul Fitri celebrated by our brothers and sisters in Tolikara. We do not justify any kind of violence that would harm our brotherhood,” PGLII general chairman Ronny Mandang said at a press conference held in Jakarta on Saturday (17/7/2015 as reported by Antara News.

PGLII made the statement in its capacity as an institution that oversees the Evangelical Church in Indonesia (GIDI). This follows an attack on Muslims who were performing Eid prayers at the yard of the 1702/JWY Sub-District Military Command.

Apart from expressing regret, PGLII also extended its sympathy to the Muslims whose Eid prayers were disrupted.
“We also wish to express our sympathy to one GIDI member who died and 11 others who were wounded in the incident,” Ronny said.

PGLII considered the incident to be a local event that did not reflect national conditions.
In view of that, Ronny appealed to the authorities to settle the case through fair law enforcement.
“The government must also investigate the root cause of the incident,” he added.

At 7am on Friday a crowd believed to be GIDI members attacked a group of Muslims who were conducting Eid prayers in Karubaga, the capital of Tolikara district.

Meanwhile, The National Commission for Human Rights (Komnas HAM) found several facts in an incident that happened in Karubuga, Tolikara Regency, Papua, on Friday, July 17, 2015.
The commission revealed that the incident did not only involve the burning of a mosque by the Evangelical Church of Indonesia (GIDI) congregation but also a shooting incident done by the police.
Natalius Pigai, a Commissioner of Komnas HAM said that eleven people were injured and one primary school student, Edi Wanimbo (15 years old) was killed in the incident. Nine of peoples where injured are Altelu Yanengga, Edi Wanimbo? (died), Perinus Wanimbo, Geratus Kogoya, Ketilu Yikwa, Erdinus Yikwa, Alies Kogoya, Emison Pagawak and Yulianus Lambe.

According to Pigai, the victims were injured by the police’ shooting before a group believed to be GIDI members set fire on Baitul Mutaqin mosque.
“The police who tried to blockade the GIDI protestors directly shot at them. Later on, the congregation vented their anger to the mosque. In fact, they were angry to the police because the police shot at some of the residents,” Pigai said on Saturday (18/7/2015).

Responding to the news and information that being circulated in Social Media, President of the Evangelical Church in Indonesia (GIDI), Rev. Dorman Wandikmbo said is not true if GIDI’s members forbids the celebration of Eid Mubarak for Muslims in Tolikara. He also denied that GIDI’s members have set a plan to burn a mushola during the incident.

Rev. Wanimbo said, about three weeks before implementing the event, local church officials had issued a notification letter claimed to have been approved and recognized by the local government and local army and police.
“When the day came, we were surprised that the police and army allowed worship to carried out in the field and using loudspeakers. We have already conveyed (our plans) in the letter,” he said.

Therefore, GIDI’s members come to negotiate with muslims who are preparing to run the Eid prayer. Negotiations have not started yet, suddenly someone of GIDI’s members was shot.
“The unrest was initially caused by the police shooting indiscriminately at residents who asked Muslims practice Eid prayers without loudspeakers,” he said on Saturday (18/7/2015).

Unhappy with the drastic response, some people vented their anger by burning kiosks, which are located not far from the mosque.
“There was never any desire to burn the mosque. Some youths who annoyed anger lashed out to nearby stalls, to show resistance against the repressive attitude of the police. No one ever thought that the fire rapidly spread to the houses and mosque,” he added. (Victor Mambor)

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Papua Governor: No more conflicts in Puncak Jaya

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Illustration of Mulia City, Puncak Jaya Regency. – Jubi / Doc

Jayapura, Jubi – Papua Governor Lukas Enembe said Puncak Jaya District there should not be a stigma for Puncak Jaya District as a conflict area because it is not a killing field. In contrary, this area is safe and peaceful.

“I governed this region once, so I know what people want. For that reason, I ask the local government officials to be able to take care of the community so to avoid more conflicts,” told Enembe to reporters on Thursday (09/13/2018) at the Office of the Papuan People’s Assembly (MRP).

Furthermore, the governor said to avoid conflicts between different tribes and groups; the government officials should not also act to represent their personal or group interests.

Separately, Papua Police Deputy Chief the Brigadier General Yakoubus Marjuki said that the police always try to use a subtle approach to solve conflicts in Papua.

“This is our commitment because we want every region in Papua to always be safe and peaceful including in Puncak Jaya.” (*)

 


Reporter: Roy Ratumakin

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Jayapura presents Tanah Merah Maritime Festival in November

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The coastal indigenous dance performed at the Tanah Merah Maritime Festival last year. – Jubi / Engel Wally

Sentani, Jubi – the Local government of Jayapura District started a campaign introducing the Maritime Festival of Tanah Merah (FBTM) that will be held from 19 to 21 November 2018 in Entiyebo, Tablanusu Village, Depapre Sub-district.

FBFM, which held in 2014 for the first time, is part of the annual tourism agenda of the local government along with the Lake Sentani Festival.

The Acting Head of Culture and Tourism Office of Jayapura District Benyamin Yerisetouw said his office has campaigned about this event to some village heads and community leaders in the five coastal sub-districts within the district.

“Our target is, by 19 to 21 November, all communities can participate in this event, in particular, those from the coastal areas, as well as domestic and international tourists,” Yerisetouw explained when met in his office on Friday (9/14/2018).

Meanwhile, the Chairman of Indonesian Commerce of Chamber and Industry of Jayapura District Hengky Yoku said the economic development of the local community relies on its potential resources.

“This area has many activities which can promote the cultural history of the local community. When this comes in forms of festival or performance, there is an economic value that resulted from transactions of local community and visitors who attend the event.” (*)

 


Reporter: Engel Wally

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Arts & Culture

Taparu in Kamoro socioculture

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Kamoro women when sorting out sago caterpillars. – Jubi / Doc

Mimika, Jubi – Each clan in Kamoro has ‘taparu’ or a specific location as a place to find food sources when they encircle rivers and mangroves in the lowland estuary of Mimika District.

A Dutch anthropologist J Power states ‘taparu’ is a local terminology emphasizing the relations of land and its inhabitants. “There are also the names of surrounding neighborhoods taken from the ancestral names,” as written in a book “Taparu Fratri of Mimika-Kamoro ethnic groups in Hiripau Village, East Mimika District, Mimika Regency”, by Dessy Pola Usmany et al. from the Ministry Education and Culture Directorate General of Culture Papua Cultural Value Conservation Center, 2013.

‘Taparu’ itself is more related to groups who inhabit within this region or surrounding environment as Kamoro people always encircle the river and sago forest for catching fish or gathering food. Everyone knows their own ‘taparu’.

‘Taparu’ in Kamoro language means the land, while Sempan people call it ‘se iwake’. If someone wants to mark the land he passes in gathering food, he solely adds the prefix ‘we’ such as tumamero-we and efato-we in Omawka village.

Similarly, people in Nawaripi village also do the same. Their areas are including Tumukamiro-we, Viriao-we, and Iwiri-we. All of these names reflect the relationship between the land and inhabitants.

Meanwhile, like the majority of Kamoro people, Ojibwa people believe in the power of their late patrilineal clan that depicted in the symbols of animals. The anthropologists call these symbols with totems which mean a belief that embodies a symbolic representation of society.

Unfortunately, today taparu also face the severest challenges of sedimentation due to tailings of mining activity that cause the silting of river and discolouration of Mollusca habitat in the estuary of Mimika District. (*)

 

Reporter: Dominggus Mampioper

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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